Bruce-Davison Movie Reviews


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VHS movie reviews for "Bruce-Davison" sorted by average review score:

Hidden in America
Released in VHS Tape by Hallmark Home Entertainment (23 September, 1997)
MPAA Rating: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Director: Martin Bell
Average review score:

Wonderful for Classroom Use
I've used this film with high school juniors for five years, and it has been a great success every time. In fact, as much as I appreciate this film, my students love it even more, and refer back to it continually. The film is a powerful tool for teaching students about the reality of poverty and hunger in America - the reality that most who are poor in this country work full time. (I only wish it could be issued in DVD format.)

A MUST-SEE independent film about poverty, pulls no punches
I was absolutely stunned the first time I saw this one. DON'T pass up your chance to see this one (or better yet own it) before it fades from the market. Better yet, share it with anyone who believes those mysths about homelessness and poverty in American - that the poor are simply lazy, shiftless, unwilling to work hard and make a go of it. If anything is likely to change their minds, this movie could. Beau Bridges shines as Bill Januson, a young widower and father who is struggling to make ends meet while caring for his two children. Bridges shows the depth of pain and confusion felt by a man who has never been poor before, who has never been unemployed before and, as a result, is too proud to accept charity, even if he fully deserves a hand up. His 11 year old son decides to take on the role of bread-winner, coming up with an ambitious scheme to raise money, a courageous decision that nearly results in complete tragedy. But this is a mere bare-bones sketch of a rich, detailed movie. The pace is slow enough to show all the decisions faced by this family every day - the times when a simple meal, clean clothes and a safe, comfortable place to live can't be taken for granted. The pain, despair and self-reliance required to get through each day is portrayed without sentimentality or manipulative drama and the young actor and actress playing the children in this one are superb and keep the movie solidly grounded. A rare heart-tugging film that makes you think about deeper issues in our society and culture.

Every "middle" class teen in America should see this!
This is one of the best movies I've seen to relate a real problem, too often we are so busy helping "mankind' we forget about the "MAN".This movie explains what its like to go from self supporting to poor overnight, every "middle class" teen and their parents should watch this movie, they will gain a new understanding of how fortunate they are. Perhaps they will even look closer at those around them, neighbor co-worker,church member etc..who may not be "making it" due to job loss or other problems and take them a meal or two!Don't wait for them to ask! thats the message of hidden in america. Hats off to the Bridges!Bless you!


Short Eyes
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Home Video ()
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Robert M. Young
Starring: Bruce Davison and José Pérez (II)
Though time and HBO's Oz have eclipsed its ground-breaking impact, Short Eyes remains a milestone of American independent film, and a vital entry in the prison-film genre. Adapted by Miguel Piñero from his acclaimed play, this gritty drama was filmed in Manhattan's infamous Men's House of Detention (better known as "the Tombs"), giving a rough, authentic edge to Piñero's unflinching portrait of men trapped in legal-system limbo. Inmate tensions intensify when an alleged pedophile ("Short Eyes" in prison slang, played by Bruce Davison) is dropped into detention, and instantly ostracized by white, Latino, and black inmates alike. Under the documentary-like direction of Robert M. Young, this claustrophobic, emotionally raw study of hopelessness was a real eye-opener for its time (1977), revealing depths of anguish, danger, and cruelty that had never before been dramatized on film. Paving the way for harsher prison dramas that followed, Short Eyes features Piñero in a supporting role, and look closely for Traffic's Luis Guzmán in his screen debut. --Jeff Shannon
Average review score:

Short Eyes
I have been looking for this movie for years. I was so glad when it was finally released on DVD. This is a powerful story with a strong cast. I would highly recommend to anyone who enjoyed OZ or other prison shows. And also to anyone who understands that the judicial system is sometimes flawed.

Reinvented the prison genre
I was introduced to Short Eyes purely by chance while flipping through Leonard Maltin's movie guide which gives the film ***1/2 stars. After tracking down an out-of-print VHS tape of it, I finally saw this powerful 70's prison drama based on the play by the newly appreciated latino playwrite Miguel Pinero. Pinero's vision is so pure because it's clearly the work of a man who'd been behind bars often himself. The dialogue is amazingly real (and very profane for its time) and the overall feeling of the film is dark, gritty and stark, very much like an episode of Oz, only twenty years before that TV show aired. Shot on location at an abandoned men's prison in New York it's stage origins are only really apparant during one brief dialogue scene between Pinero (acting in his own work) and Davis (the incarerated child molestor who inflames the hatred of the other inmates).

For me the comparison that really makes me appreciate this film is with The Shawshank Redemption. That is a good film but it's also clearly the work of a man (Stephen King) who had never been behind bars for any length of time. While in that film there are two or three stereotyped baddies in the entire prison who force the hero into sex, in Short Eyes it's made very clear how long, long periods behind bars with no access to women begins to grind on many of the inmates and their desires, even men who wouldn't consider themselves to be "gay". The scene where the youngest, "prettiest" inmate Cupcake is harrased in the showers by an older guy who all but forces him into sex feels completely real, like it's the way something like that would really happen. The fact that Pinero himself (who wrote the original play) was bisexual certainly accounts for the films (virtually unique) honesty in this area.

Benjamin Bratt played Pinero in a pretty good film of the writers life the other year. That's definitely work a look but it's Short Eyes that will make you realize why he was the talk of New York at the time.

Short eyes has true vision
Miguel Pinero is the most underated playwright of modern American theater. His play short eyes shows us the ugly underbelly of American society through the eyes of convicts. It is a play filled with ethnic anomosity racial rivalaries and a rigid moral code which allows no devation. Truly this film version of the stage play is worth looking at. Bruce Davidson performace is complelling and the rest of the cast never miss a beat. It is not for the faint hearted.
Most unfortunate is that Mr. Pinero is no longer with us but some might remember the Miami Vice episodes he penned


Short Eyes
Released in VHS Tape by Wellspring Media, In (12 August, 2003)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Robert M. Young
Starring: Bruce Davison and José Pérez (II)
Though time and HBO's Oz have eclipsed its ground-breaking impact, Short Eyes remains a milestone of American independent film, and a vital entry in the prison-film genre. Adapted by Miguel Piñero from his acclaimed play, this gritty drama was filmed in Manhattan's infamous Men's House of Detention (better known as "the Tombs"), giving a rough, authentic edge to Piñero's unflinching portrait of men trapped in legal-system limbo. Inmate tensions intensify when an alleged pedophile ("Short Eyes" in prison slang, played by Bruce Davison) is dropped into detention, and instantly ostracized by white, Latino, and black inmates alike. Under the documentary-like direction of Robert M. Young, this claustrophobic, emotionally raw study of hopelessness was a real eye-opener for its time (1977), revealing depths of anguish, danger, and cruelty that had never before been dramatized on film. Paving the way for harsher prison dramas that followed, Short Eyes features Piñero in a supporting role, and look closely for Traffic's Luis Guzmán in his screen debut. --Jeff Shannon
Average review score:

Short Eyes
I have been looking for this movie for years. I was so glad when it was finally released on DVD. This is a powerful story with a strong cast. I would highly recommend to anyone who enjoyed OZ or other prison shows. And also to anyone who understands that the judicial system is sometimes flawed.

Reinvented the prison genre
I was introduced to Short Eyes purely by chance while flipping through Leonard Maltin's movie guide which gives the film ***1/2 stars. After tracking down an out-of-print VHS tape of it, I finally saw this powerful 70's prison drama based on the play by the newly appreciated latino playwrite Miguel Pinero. Pinero's vision is so pure because it's clearly the work of a man who'd been behind bars often himself. The dialogue is amazingly real (and very profane for its time) and the overall feeling of the film is dark, gritty and stark, very much like an episode of Oz, only twenty years before that TV show aired. Shot on location at an abandoned men's prison in New York it's stage origins are only really apparant during one brief dialogue scene between Pinero (acting in his own work) and Davis (the incarerated child molestor who inflames the hatred of the other inmates).

For me the comparison that really makes me appreciate this film is with The Shawshank Redemption. That is a good film but it's also clearly the work of a man (Stephen King) who had never been behind bars for any length of time. While in that film there are two or three stereotyped baddies in the entire prison who force the hero into sex, in Short Eyes it's made very clear how long, long periods behind bars with no access to women begins to grind on many of the inmates and their desires, even men who wouldn't consider themselves to be "gay". The scene where the youngest, "prettiest" inmate Cupcake is harrased in the showers by an older guy who all but forces him into sex feels completely real, like it's the way something like that would really happen. The fact that Pinero himself (who wrote the original play) was bisexual certainly accounts for the films (virtually unique) honesty in this area.

Benjamin Bratt played Pinero in a pretty good film of the writers life the other year. That's definitely work a look but it's Short Eyes that will make you realize why he was the talk of New York at the time.

Short eyes has true vision
Miguel Pinero is the most underated playwright of modern American theater. His play short eyes shows us the ugly underbelly of American society through the eyes of convicts. It is a play filled with ethnic anomosity racial rivalaries and a rigid moral code which allows no devation. Truly this film version of the stage play is worth looking at. Bruce Davidson performace is complelling and the rest of the cast never miss a beat. It is not for the faint hearted.
Most unfortunate is that Mr. Pinero is no longer with us but some might remember the Miami Vice episodes he penned


Down, Out and Dangerous
Released in VHS Tape by Paramount Home Video (16 July, 1996)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Noel Nosseck
Average review score:

it¿s a thin line between good and evil
Richard Thomas is perfectly cast in this TV movie, since playing a creepy sociopath utilises his weakness as an actor. As a homeless man who insinuates himself into the life of Bruce Davison, like Glenn Close in Fatal Attraction but without the sex, Thomas is first seen in Charles Manson beard and long hair. This getup hides his facial mole which defines him as much as the cleft in Kirk Douglas' chin. One may find the presentation of the homeless as greedy psychopaths offensive, particularly when Thomas demonstrates an accumulation of money from begging. However once we learn how Thomas has become homeless, with the suggestion that he hasn't been on the street for long, the shaming stereotype lessens. The first resentment of Thomas' street behaviour is a test for the audience's tolerance. Is Thomas harassing or is the person he approaches over-reacting? Since we have seen that Thomas is accumulating, and his reaction to the man's refusal, we are more likely to read Thomas as dangerous, even if the title didn't already say so. Director Noel Nosseck even makes a demonic parallel, though specifying it would spoil the climax, and I could have done without one close-up with Thomas' face half lit. Thomas claims that he "knows people", which is always the excuse of the sociopath, and his in-your-face technique creates the opposite desired effect to any reasonable person -anyone who doesn't see through the banality of his trying to be friendly act deserves whatever happens to them. Nosseck actually uses this effect when Thomas has a tirade which reveals his intention. The teleplay by Carey and Chad Hayes is streamlined. Nothing seems superfluous, everything feeds the narrative, and Nosseck keeps things moving. We get a standard hiding so as not to be discovered when Thomas' room is being searched and he returns unexpectedly but without an obvious conclusion, some off-camera killings, and the jovial smile of a detective falling from his face when it is no longer required. Davison can play this kind of nice guy family man in his sleep but thankfully he is given limits when provoked.


Homage
Released in VHS Tape by Arrow Video (29 May, 2001)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Ross Kagan Marks
Average review score:

Homage Deserves A Larger Viewing Audience
It's a shame this video is so prohibitively expensive at present because it is well worth viewing. Adapted by playwright Mark Medoff (Children of a Lesser God) from its stage version, it offers subtle, complex characterizations by Blythe Danner, Frank Whaley and Bruce Davison and a magnificent New Mexico locale that I found fascinating because it is so very different from the landscape in the East. As a gritty look at the link between genius and obsession, the film could be classified as a psychological thriller, except that the viewer knows the ending from the start. The suspense is in how the characters get to the place where two are marked for death, and in its tragic inevitability. Blythe Danner, who is seen infrequently, but who maintains an onscreen presence that commands notice, is a retired school teacher who cannot teach her most important students-her own television star daughter, and the antisocial young man whom she befriends and who betrays her. It is an unusual film with the kind of excellent, crafted dialogue one expects from a playwright, some stylish directing and notable acting performances.


Off Season
Released in VHS Tape by Showtime Entertainme (19 November, 2002)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Bruce Davison
Average review score:

Superb
The screenplay justifiably won an Emmy. The movie was nominated for five (5) Emmies and won two (2). The dialog is brilliant and the leading characters are very appealing. It is one of the best movies that I have ever seen (I am reviewing the movie, not the DVD). It is a movie that the whole family would really enjoy.
The plot twist at the end is wonderful.


Far From Home - The Adventures of Yellow Dog
Released in VHS Tape by Twentieth Century Fox (11 March, 2003)
MPAA Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Director: Phillip Borsos
Starring: Mimi Rogers, Bruce Davison, and Jesse Bradford
A boy (Jesse Bradford) and his yellow Labrador are marooned on a wilderness island in British Columbia and must find their way home through uncharted forests. This is a story about friendship and personal strength, focusing on the relationship between a boy and his dog as they battle the elements, the terrain and, of course, wild animals in their effort to find their way home and survive their harsh surroundings. Director Philip Borsos has a nice eye for those Ansel Adams-like moments--but scenery only carries a movie so far and this movie asks too much. Though relatively short at 81 minutes, it still feels long. --Marshall Fine
Average review score:

Good Family Movie
Our family really enjoys this movie. The story is not terribly predictable and the actors all do a solid job. Beautiful scenery and enough action to keep the little ones engaged. Should be on DVD. We'll add it to our collection.

far from home: the adventures of yellow dog
well,this just goes to show why you don't blindly accept a critics review. I own a yellow lab(2) and I can tell you this is a pretty realistic. Yes I guess the critics would like to see a gloom and doom ending but I dont think they heard of the true story of when one of these trmendously faithful conpanions carried his master half a mile back to his home after he suffered a near fatal heart attack(would have been fatal if not for yellows actions). It is a very heartwarming story without being predictable and just fantastic views. The heck with critics. Buy this because it makes you feel good and that there wasnt a need for explosions or car chases or guns to provide for interesting viewing.

Great for young and old
I bought this for my son when he was five years old. I wanted to purchase something that was not a cartoon, but would still fit into his age group. He still watches it at ten years old, and we now have his younger brother joining in. I haven't found anyone who doesn't enjoy this video. His great grandmother even enjoyed it. It is a video good for both young and old alike.


Far From Home-Adventures of Ye
Released in VHS Tape by Twentieth Century Fox (28 May, 1996)
MPAA Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Director: Phillip Borsos
Starring: Mimi Rogers, Bruce Davison, and Jesse Bradford
A boy (Jesse Bradford) and his yellow Labrador are marooned on a wilderness island in British Columbia and must find their way home through uncharted forests. This is a story about friendship and personal strength, focusing on the relationship between a boy and his dog as they battle the elements, the terrain and, of course, wild animals in their effort to find their way home and survive their harsh surroundings. Director Philip Borsos has a nice eye for those Ansel Adams-like moments--but scenery only carries a movie so far and this movie asks too much. Though relatively short at 81 minutes, it still feels long. --Marshall Fine
Average review score:

Good Family Movie
Our family really enjoys this movie. The story is not terribly predictable and the actors all do a solid job. Beautiful scenery and enough action to keep the little ones engaged. Should be on DVD. We'll add it to our collection.

far from home: the adventures of yellow dog
well,this just goes to show why you don't blindly accept a critics review. I own a yellow lab(2) and I can tell you this is a pretty realistic. Yes I guess the critics would like to see a gloom and doom ending but I dont think they heard of the true story of when one of these trmendously faithful conpanions carried his master half a mile back to his home after he suffered a near fatal heart attack(would have been fatal if not for yellows actions). It is a very heartwarming story without being predictable and just fantastic views. The heck with critics. Buy this because it makes you feel good and that there wasnt a need for explosions or car chases or guns to provide for interesting viewing.

Great for young and old
I bought this for my son when he was five years old. I wanted to purchase something that was not a cartoon, but would still fit into his age group. He still watches it at ten years old, and we now have his younger brother joining in. I haven't found anyone who doesn't enjoy this video. His great grandmother even enjoyed it. It is a video good for both young and old alike.


Far from Home: The Adventures of Yellow Dog
Released in VHS Tape by Twentieth Century Fox (11 March, 2003)
MPAA Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Director: Phillip Borsos
Starring: Mimi Rogers, Bruce Davison, and Jesse Bradford
A boy (Jesse Bradford) and his yellow Labrador are marooned on a wilderness island in British Columbia and must find their way home through uncharted forests. This is a story about friendship and personal strength, focusing on the relationship between a boy and his dog as they battle the elements, the terrain and, of course, wild animals in their effort to find their way home and survive their harsh surroundings. Director Philip Borsos has a nice eye for those Ansel Adams-like moments--but scenery only carries a movie so far and this movie asks too much. Though relatively short at 81 minutes, it still feels long. --Marshall Fine
Average review score:

Good Family Movie
Our family really enjoys this movie. The story is not terribly predictable and the actors all do a solid job. Beautiful scenery and enough action to keep the little ones engaged. Should be on DVD. We'll add it to our collection.

far from home: the adventures of yellow dog
well,this just goes to show why you don't blindly accept a critics review. I own a yellow lab(2) and I can tell you this is a pretty realistic. Yes I guess the critics would like to see a gloom and doom ending but I dont think they heard of the true story of when one of these trmendously faithful conpanions carried his master half a mile back to his home after he suffered a near fatal heart attack(would have been fatal if not for yellows actions). It is a very heartwarming story without being predictable and just fantastic views. The heck with critics. Buy this because it makes you feel good and that there wasnt a need for explosions or car chases or guns to provide for interesting viewing.

Great for young and old
I bought this for my son when he was five years old. I wanted to purchase something that was not a cartoon, but would still fit into his age group. He still watches it at ten years old, and we now have his younger brother joining in. I haven't found anyone who doesn't enjoy this video. His great grandmother even enjoyed it. It is a video good for both young and old alike.


Far From Home:Adventures of Yellow Do
Released in VHS Tape by Fox Home Entertainme (12 May, 1998)
MPAA Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Director: Phillip Borsos
Starring: Mimi Rogers, Bruce Davison, and Jesse Bradford
A boy (Jesse Bradford) and his yellow Labrador are marooned on a wilderness island in British Columbia and must find their way home through uncharted forests. This is a story about friendship and personal strength, focusing on the relationship between a boy and his dog as they battle the elements, the terrain and, of course, wild animals in their effort to find their way home and survive their harsh surroundings. Director Philip Borsos has a nice eye for those Ansel Adams-like moments--but scenery only carries a movie so far and this movie asks too much. Though relatively short at 81 minutes, it still feels long. --Marshall Fine
Average review score:

Good Family Movie
Our family really enjoys this movie. The story is not terribly predictable and the actors all do a solid job. Beautiful scenery and enough action to keep the little ones engaged. Should be on DVD. We'll add it to our collection.

far from home: the adventures of yellow dog
well,this just goes to show why you don't blindly accept a critics review. I own a yellow lab(2) and I can tell you this is a pretty realistic. Yes I guess the critics would like to see a gloom and doom ending but I dont think they heard of the true story of when one of these trmendously faithful conpanions carried his master half a mile back to his home after he suffered a near fatal heart attack(would have been fatal if not for yellows actions). It is a very heartwarming story without being predictable and just fantastic views. The heck with critics. Buy this because it makes you feel good and that there wasnt a need for explosions or car chases or guns to provide for interesting viewing.

Great for young and old
I bought this for my son when he was five years old. I wanted to purchase something that was not a cartoon, but would still fit into his age group. He still watches it at ten years old, and we now have his younger brother joining in. I haven't found anyone who doesn't enjoy this video. His great grandmother even enjoyed it. It is a video good for both young and old alike.


Related Subjects: Bridget-Fonda
More Pages: Bruce-Davison Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9