David-Prowse Movie Reviews


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VHS movie reviews for "David-Prowse" sorted by average review score:

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
Released in VHS Tape by BBC Video (20 July, 2000)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Alan J.W. Bell
Starring: Simon Jones and David Dixon
The production values aren't the greatest here, but this adaptation does capture some of the ebullient, hilarious anarchy of Douglas Adams's book. Arthur Dent discovers that his friend, Ford Prefect, isn't human at all but an alien on assignment, writing for the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. Many of Adams's delicious asides are dropped off here, like the woman who figures out the meaning of life right at the moment that she gets blown up with the rest of the Earth, but it retains what it can. Sure, the book was better, and the realization of Zaphod Beeblebox and Trillian are, well, just different, but it's a great introduction to the series for the uninitiated. --Keith Simanton
Average review score:

What a DVD Should Be - D. Adams would be proud
This is a review of the DVD set itself, as I assuming most of you already know the story and have possibly seen the TV show. This is a digitally remastered DVD with a stereo soundtrack and clear crisp visuals.

It's actually a two DVD set. The TV series, which is on the first DVD, is as near to a flawless reproduction as is currently possible. Watch it with the lights off to enjoy all the visuals and matte painting special effects that were available in 1981 with a shoestring budget. Additionally, this is a "must buy" just for the second DVD alone. Outtakes and deleted scenes, behind-the-scenes footage, The Making of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, BBC Omnibus Tribute to Douglas Adams, and much more.

BBC Video has stepped up and hit a homerun with this DVD set. Be sure to watch it with and recommend it to your friends. "Share and enjoy!"

Discover the secret to the number 42
The video is based on the TV series, which is based on the books and the radio play. The radio play is hilariously satirical and very creative. The TV series was on PBS years ago and pops up every so often. Great story. The characters in the TV series don't quite measure up to the radio play but are good anyway. The story does measure up and the cheesy special effects only add to the fun. It's a Monty Python-esque view of space and travel in general with great commentary on our society and its peculiarities. The Hitchhiker's Guide is all you need to travel the universe and is essential when your planet is destroyed to make way for a hyperspace bypass. The Guide is many things: a primer on Vogon poetry, a guide to using the Babel fish, and a calming influence with it's friendly "don't panic" on the cover. The best character in the show may be Marvin the paranoid robot but Arthur Dent, Ford, Trillian and Zaphod are just right for fans of the books and play. The restaurant at the end of the universe is the place to be seen. All this and mice make the world go 'round. Zany and original. A definite find! It really can't be fully explained within the limits of a short review. Now if someone will only put out the radio show on CD!

Funny, funny, hysterically funny. . .
. . .over-the-top campiness!

For anyone who has read the "Hitchhiker" books, this DVD collection is a "must-have". Obviously done on a shoe-string budget, this lack of "high-tech" makes the show more appealing -- not less. I've read all the books many times over -- and the DVD literally had me laughing out loud.

A joy for all Douglas Adams fans, and for all fans of campy British Sci-Fi television.

Highly recommended.


Carry On Henry
Released in VHS Tape by Jef Films Int. (06 August, 1998)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Gerald Thomas
Starring: Sid James and Kenneth Williams
Average review score:

Classic Carry On
Following on from the hot success of Carry On Loving (1970), the gang retreated into another historical theme. The series always seemed to be at its finest when doing a period comedy and Carry On Henry (1970) ranks up there with some of the greats of the series such as Cleo (1964), Don't Lose Your Head (1966), Screaming (1966) and Up The Kyber (1968).

Fresh from having one of his wives beheaded (Patsy Rolands), King Henry (played brilliantly by Sid James, injecting his usual rogue-like characterisation into the role) immediatley marries Quen Marie (a superb comic turn from Joan Sims in what is possibly her most lengthy and amusing role in the series) but once they retreat to the bed chamber, Henry discovers that Marie continually stinks of garlic and she is not about to give it up for anyone. As Marie is sister to the King of France, Henry realises it won't be so easy to have this wife beheaded. He soon becomes besotted with Bettina (beautifully played by the bubbly Barbara Windsor who said that this was her favourite Carry On) and soon plots to get rid of his French Queen.

This Carry On film stands very well and Talbot Rothwells dialogue races along, sparkling with witty repartee and fast, furious one-liners. Sid James, Joan Sims and Barbara Windsor are easily the best players here, though Kenneth Williams and Charles Hawtrey camp it up to the end and are consistently amusing in doing so. Also popping up are Terry Scott as Cardinal Wolsey and Kenneth Connor as Lord Hampton of Wick. The location filming and grand, elaborate sets are authentic and Eric Rogers music is masterful. Possibly the best 1970's Carry On film.

SID JAMES AT HIS BEST
As Carry On Henry opens it explains that the life and the many, many loves of Henry VIII are chronicled by one William Cobbler - so we can rightly describe the work as Cobblers.

Like most of the historical Carry On's it is totally hilarious throughout with many classic one liners being delivered by this immpecable team of players which includes Sid James in the title role and possibly the best ever role he played in a Carry On film. Also in the cast are Joan Sims as Henry's garlic eating wife who he wishes to divorce as well as Kenneth Williams who is as always on top form with his mincing and outrageously camp humour, Charles Hawtrey, Barbara Windsor in a considerably smaller role than usual, Terry Scott, Peter Butterworth and Kenneth Connor. The two golden stars must go to Sid james and Joan Sims as both put in memroable performances and Joan Sims in particular is in one of her most lengthy and amusing roles.

Talbot Rothwells script sparkles with wit and although a lot of the jokes are as corny as ever they are still undeniably funny which is solely down to the way they're delivered by this capable and competent team.

Carry On Henry is one of the best entries from the 1970's as the series was not far off a rapid decline in Box Office ratings. Recommended

Slow-moving, but in parts hilarious British comedy from 1972
The Carry On team are at it again in "Carry On Henry VIII" (original title: "Carry On Henry", UK 1972). It delves into the dirty dealings of English history and to the many wives of King Henry VIII. One of the best of the series, and worth the $30.00!


Carry on Henry VIII
Released in VHS Tape by Palm Beach Entertain (27 April, 1994)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Gerald Thomas
Starring: Sid James and Kenneth Williams
Average review score:

Classic Carry On
Following on from the hot success of Carry On Loving (1970), the gang retreated into another historical theme. The series always seemed to be at its finest when doing a period comedy and Carry On Henry (1970) ranks up there with some of the greats of the series such as Cleo (1964), Don't Lose Your Head (1966), Screaming (1966) and Up The Kyber (1968).

Fresh from having one of his wives beheaded (Patsy Rolands), King Henry (played brilliantly by Sid James, injecting his usual rogue-like characterisation into the role) immediatley marries Quen Marie (a superb comic turn from Joan Sims in what is possibly her most lengthy and amusing role in the series) but once they retreat to the bed chamber, Henry discovers that Marie continually stinks of garlic and she is not about to give it up for anyone. As Marie is sister to the King of France, Henry realises it won't be so easy to have this wife beheaded. He soon becomes besotted with Bettina (beautifully played by the bubbly Barbara Windsor who said that this was her favourite Carry On) and soon plots to get rid of his French Queen.

This Carry On film stands very well and Talbot Rothwells dialogue races along, sparkling with witty repartee and fast, furious one-liners. Sid James, Joan Sims and Barbara Windsor are easily the best players here, though Kenneth Williams and Charles Hawtrey camp it up to the end and are consistently amusing in doing so. Also popping up are Terry Scott as Cardinal Wolsey and Kenneth Connor as Lord Hampton of Wick. The location filming and grand, elaborate sets are authentic and Eric Rogers music is masterful. Possibly the best 1970's Carry On film.

SID JAMES AT HIS BEST
As Carry On Henry opens it explains that the life and the many, many loves of Henry VIII are chronicled by one William Cobbler - so we can rightly describe the work as Cobblers.

Like most of the historical Carry On's it is totally hilarious throughout with many classic one liners being delivered by this immpecable team of players which includes Sid James in the title role and possibly the best ever role he played in a Carry On film. Also in the cast are Joan Sims as Henry's garlic eating wife who he wishes to divorce as well as Kenneth Williams who is as always on top form with his mincing and outrageously camp humour, Charles Hawtrey, Barbara Windsor in a considerably smaller role than usual, Terry Scott, Peter Butterworth and Kenneth Connor. The two golden stars must go to Sid james and Joan Sims as both put in memroable performances and Joan Sims in particular is in one of her most lengthy and amusing roles.

Talbot Rothwells script sparkles with wit and although a lot of the jokes are as corny as ever they are still undeniably funny which is solely down to the way they're delivered by this capable and competent team.

Carry On Henry is one of the best entries from the 1970's as the series was not far off a rapid decline in Box Office ratings. Recommended

Slow-moving, but in parts hilarious British comedy from 1972
The Carry On team are at it again in "Carry On Henry VIII" (original title: "Carry On Henry", UK 1972). It delves into the dirty dealings of English history and to the many wives of King Henry VIII. One of the best of the series, and worth the $30.00!


Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell
Released in VHS Tape by Paramount Studio (09 September, 1992)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Terence Fisher
Starring: Peter Cushing and Shane Briant
Though it wasn't Hammer Studios' final film, Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell can be considered its swan song, an intelligent, inventive, stylized reworking of the themes that had sustained the series for almost two decades. Dr. Frankenstein has buried his old identity and reigns over an insane asylum as Dr. Victor (Peter Cushing under a flamboyant blond wig in his sixth and final turn as the mad scientist) as if it were a live-parts yard for his continuing experiments. With the help of an ambitious acolyte he builds his latest creature, a hirsute apelike brute stitched together from the asylum's most promising inhabitants and turned into a sad, tortured slave. The film was shot at the end of Hammer's glory days, and the budgetary constraints can be seen in unconvincing miniatures and the rather bulky and stiff ogre suit, but the dark, claustrophobic sets create an effectively gloomy atmosphere. Director Terence Fisher effectively pulls out all stops for a marvelous sequence of the creature digging through the asylum graveyard in the middle of a flashing electrical storm, a demonic twist on the iconic gravedigging images that go all the way back to the 1931 Frankenstein. This was the last reunion for Cushing and Fisher, who together gave birth to Hammer's gothic reign with The Curse of Frankenstein and Horror of Dracula. Fisher retired after finishing the film. --Sean Axmaker
Average review score:

Late night Hammer Horror from the great Terrence Fisher!
Frankenstein & the Monster from Hell (1974) is not a bad movie. Its not terribly exciting, but it definitely has it's moments and is worth a look for horror fans and most likely a buy for lovers of Hammer Films, Terrence Fisher, and Peter Cushing. I guess also for fans of David Prowse (body of Darth Vader) who plays "the monster from hell"! This is Hammer director Terrence Fisher's last film, another reason why it's worth a look. Fisher is responsible for much of Hammer's horror classics: all 5 Frankenstein films, Horror of Dracula, The Mummy, Curse of the Werewolf, The Gorgon, Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll, Phantom of the Opera, the list goes on...

This is also the last film in Hammer's Frankenstein series. It all started in 1957 with The Curse of Frankenstein, an absolute classic starring Cushing as Victor Frankenstein and Christopher Lee as the Creature. This is followed by Revenge of Frankenstein (1958), Frankenstein created Woman (1967), and Frankenstein must be Destroyed (1969), which brings us to The Monster from Hell (1974).

The plot concerns Victor Frankenstein (Cushing) being the resident medical doctor at an insane asylum where he secretly experiments with creating his own being. He's also a patient, by the way! He soon meets a young patient/doctor, Simon Helder (Shane Briant), who is sent to the asylum because he is caught doing similar experiments in the outside world. Frankenstein takes Helder under his wing and uses him to perform surgeries that he can no longer do because of his burnt hands. Frankenstein lets Helder in on what he's doing and introduces him to "the monster from hell" played and grunted by David Prowse of Darth Vader fame. Long story short, Frankenstein's creation grows tired of his lifestyle...and watch out!

This film is nowhere near as bad/silly as others may write. Yes there are bits of cheese, a laugh or two, and some underacted scenes, but don't most horror films have that? Its not a scarefest, but its not a laughfest either. Besides,its Cushing, Fisher, and Hammer for cryin' out loud! Paramount's DVD has a good looking 16:9 widescreen transfer, decent dolby digital mono sound, and english subtitles. Making it special is a commentary by David Prowse, Madeline Smith (Sarah/"Angel", Frankenstein's initially mute assistant) and historian Johnathan Sothcott. It also can be purchased for the same price as renting it a few times! All in all, it isn't the best Hammer film to start with, but it has its good qualities, most importantly atmospheric direction from Fisher and a solid creepy performance by Cushing, may they both rest in peace. Thanks to both of them for giving us so many classics.

The last film in Hammer's legendary Frankesntein series
"Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell" is not only the last film in Hammer's Frankenstein series, it was director Terence Fisher's last work as well. Here we have Baron Victor Frankenstein (Peter Cushing, back where he belongs after the debacle of "Horror of Frankenstein") playing the role of mentor. Young Simon Helder (Shane Briant) has been trying to follow in the legendary footsteps of Dr. Frankenstein but is convicted of sorcery by the authorities and imprisoned in Carlsbd Asylum. However, Simon is saved from being brutalized by the inmate's physician, "Dr. Victor," who soon has the young man helping him with his nefarious experiments. Since his hands were damaged in "Evil of Frankenstein," Victor has a mute girl named Angel (Madeline Smith) sew together his new creature (David Prowse again). Simon helps procure various organs until only the brain remains and Victor wants to use that of Professor Durendal (Charles Lloyd Pack), a musicial and mathematical genius prone to fits of violence. Frankenstein drives Durendal to suicide and performs the brain transplant. Now in the brutish body of the "monster," Durendal finds he can no longer play his beloved violin. Then the homicidal tendencies of the body began to take over, Simon has grave doubts about the entire experiment, and the Baron comes up with his most revolting plan ever as we head towards the final climax.

Ultimately this is a slightly above average Hammer Frankenstein movie. Certainly the Baron is tipping back towards the amoral/sadistic side of his character, but the monster is almost as sympathetic a figure as it was in "Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed." However, the blood and gore quotient is as high as you will find in any Hammer film. The biggest problem with "Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell" is that Victor's motivations are totally stripped away: Dr. Frankenstein makes monsters, so that is what he does in this movie. No longer a figure of ambiguity, Victor is now just like a force of nature, playing God and leaving the rest of the cast in his wake.

Great Low-Budget Horror Film
I believe this film is an all out great horror fanfare! Cushing is simply brilliant as the infamous Doctor and Bryant is also equally great as his protogue. Sure, "the monster from hell" lacks a bit in the make up department and his olger suit is quite a bit cartoonish but hey, its pretty good for a Hammer film wich is entiled "Frankenstein and the Monster From Hell". Hammer films are some of my favorites and this is no exception, its a great horror piece, really good for those cold dark nights to watch while eating pizza.


Blacksnake
Released in VHS Tape by Russ Meyer Films (04 March, 1996)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Russ Meyer
Average review score:

A strange Russ Meyer exploitation film about exploitation
I could tell you that "Blacksnake!" is set on the Caribbean Isle of San Cristobal, where Lady Susan (Anouska Hempel, "On Her Majesty's Secret Service") runs her plantation and her slaves as she sees fit, with the aid of her brutal overseers and big bull whip. Or I could just point out that this 1973 film was directed by Russ Meyer and leave you to draw the obvious conclusions from that particular fact. But if you have ever seen a Russ Meyer film, such as "Faster Pussycat! Kill! Kil1!" or "Beneath the Valley of the Ultravixens," this fact might surprise you, because the women in this film are not as overly endowed, as is the norm in a Meyer exploitation film. That makes "Blacksnake!" a most atypical film from the legendary director.

The plot has to do with the disappearance of Lady Susan's latest husband (David Prowse, yes Darth Vader himself from the first "Star Wars" trilogy). When his brother Walker (David Warbeck, "Trog") shows up to investigate he discovers the slaves are horribly abused and that everybody is really obsessed with sex (I told you this was a Russ Meyer film). So what we have is an exploitation film about a period of exploitation, if that makes any sense. The result is a curious combination of camp and sleaze, topped off by a slave revolt and a stirring speech on the evils of slavery, colonization, yadda yadda yadda. If "Blacksnake!" (gee, I wonder what the title is suppose to mean) is the first and only Russ Meyer film you see, then you are never going to understand what the fuss is all about, which would also be true if you screened "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls" (scripted by Roger Ebert). You might also never be able to watch another slave plantation movie for the rest of your life.

Hits the spot
I can confirm, as you might expect, that the storyline is predictably weak and corny.

If like myself, however, you are only interested in scenes of a beautiful woman wielding a bullwhip you won't be disappointed!


The People That Time Forgot
Released in VHS Tape by Mgm/Ua Studios (17 July, 2001)
MPAA Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Director: Kevin Connor
If you like big fake dinosaurs--and who doesn't?--this is the movie for you. Patrick Wayne stars as the intrepid Major Ben McBride, searching the Arctic for his lost friend. Sarah Douglas is at his side as Charly, the spunky lady photographer with a dainty puckish streak. As luck would have it, they come across a tropical zone that is home to big fake dinosaurs, surly Neanderthals, and nubile cavewomen with truly astonishing cleavage. Ah, but if only it were that simple. An evil rival tribe has been exterminating the gentle cave people and must be stopped. Whatever else you may want to say about producers Samuel Z. Arkoff and John Dark, they simply do not skimp on explosions. The People That Time Forgot has a detonation-filled corker of an ending that leaves the cast absolutely showered with dirt clods. Highly entertaining. --Ali Davis
Average review score:

Take a journey into the (cough, cough) lost land....
I purchased this not expecting a lot, and I wasn't disappointed. Loosely based on the writings of Edgar Rice Burrows, The People That Time Forgot (1977) is actually the third movie in a trilogy, the other two being The Land That Time Forgot (1975), and At the Earth's Core (1976).

The movie starts off on a ship cruising around artic waters. We learn an expedition has been mounted to locate Bowen Tyler (Doug McClure) who went missing from a previous campaign. The team is made up of your fairly standard expedition team members, including the somewhat chauvinistic and handsome leader, Major Ben McBride (Patrick Wayne, son of John Wayne), his comic relief, boozy (he calls it 'nerve tonic'), smart alecky co-pilot/mechanic Hogan (Shane Rimmer), a beautiful and spunky photographer Lady Charlotte Cunningham (Sarah Douglas), and finally the crusty, brushy mustached anthropologist type (you know what I'm talking about) Dr. Edwin Norfolk (Thorley Walters). Once the boat arrives at a certain location among the icebergs, the team sets out in a rather goofy looking amphibian aircraft. Now I'm no aeronautical engineer, but I credit the fact that this thing could fly more to Hollywood magic than to its' soundness as an aircraft.

After flying for about, oh ten minutes or so, the snow-capped mountains give way to a tropical landscape (some lost land). This sets up the first encounter with a dinosaur, a very amorous yet lifeless, wooden pterodactyl. After the flying creature tries to mate with the plane, the amphibian aircraft suffers some damage and must land. Once on the ground, Ben decides that he, Lady Charlotte and Dr. Norfolk will go searching for Bowen Tyler, while Hogan will stay behind and make the necessary repairs to the dubious aircraft.

During their search, the trio runs into a rather busty cavewoman named Ajor (Dana Gillespie) clad in typical, skimpy, barely there cavewoman attire. I have to say, Ajor is one of the most well groomed cavewoman I've ever seen, and I've seen a lot of them. Turns out she knows Bowen, as she came from a tribe that he's been living with for the last two years. She also states (she learned to speak English from Bowen) that another tribe wiped out her tribe out of jealousy and kidnapped Bowen. Apparently, competition to evolve within the cave dwelling community is pretty fierce, and Bowen would certainly provide and advantage.

Okay, so Ajor leads the group to the ancient City of the Skulls. See that really bad matte painting? This must be the place. On approaching the city, a group of samurai soldiers comes out to greet and escort them into the city. Once there, we get to meet the leader, Saballa. Oh man, this guy's a treat! Imagine the Jolly Green Giant only shorter, uglier, and extremely out of shape and you've got Saballa. I kept expecting him to produce a can of corn niblets. Anyway, seems Saballa doesn't want to be friends, and throws the men into a cell, while keeping the women with the intention of sacrificing them to the mighty volcano god.

While in their cell, the two men found out Bowen Tyler is in the next cell, and they push their way through the wall (some cell) and we get our first look at heavily bearded and unkempt Bowen (Doug McClure). The men escape, mount a rescue for the women, which leads up to a final confrontation with Saballa and some of his goons. I have to say, those samurai outfits looked pretty good, but seem very much out of place in a movie about a prehistoric land. The group escapes, but now the volcano god is angered (I guess), as all hell breaks loose. I had to wonder if the studio had a surplus stash of explosives they wanted to get rid of, as the last ten minutes or so of the movies is laden with the landscape blowing up, blowing up real good. Do they all make it? Does everyone survive? Do I really care at this point? No, and you won't either.

Basically this movie played out like an hour and a half version of the TV show Land of the Lost. Looking for a good, or even passable adaptation of Edgar Rice Burroughs's book? Stick with the book. This isn't a completely awful movie, as there's plenty of laughs, and a little eye candy, but I'd be hard pressed to recommend anyone run out and buy this one.

Another reviewer mentioned the appearance of David Prowse as the executioner in this movie and his going on to play Darth Vader in a little movie called Star Wars...another tie in to that movie is the hairstyle Sarah Douglas sports is exactly the same as Princess Leia's except Sarah's cinnibuns are a bit smaller.

Who cares about finding Tyler Bowen. What happened to Lisa?
"The People That Time Forgot" is a 1977 sequel to the 1975 film "The Land That Time Forgot." In between these two there was the 1976 film "At the Earth's Core," which is mentioned mainly because all three films star Doug McClure, are directed by Kevin Connor, and are based on novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Ironically, the tag line for this film makes it sound like the films are a trilogy, although "At the Earth's Core" is based on the Pelucidar series. This film is definitely the weakest of the three, which is not all that surprising because it is based on the second book of a second rate series of potboilers by ERB. Once you get past Tarzan if you are looking for an ERB property to turn into a film you should be looking at the Martian novels about John Carter first, and then maybe Carson of Venus series or "The Outlaw of Torn." But this Burroughs rehash of "The Lost World" is not the place to go looking first.

The basic plot reminds you a lot of "Return to the Planet of the Apes. Major Ben McBridge (Patrick Wayne) leads an expedition to Antarctica to find his friend, the American adventurer Bowen Tyler (Doug McClure), who is marooned on the lost continent, Caprona, a.k.a., the land that time forgot, where there are dinosaurs and cavemen. McBridge has a plane, but it crashes and his little expedition has to survive until they find McClure (where they can break the good news that they are there to rescue him!). McClure had to deal with Germans from a U-Boat but McBridge has to put up with Lady Charlotte Cunningham (Sarah Douglas), who goes from royal pain to damsel in distress pretty quickly once things start happening, Dr. Edwin Norfolk (Thorley Walters), who fortunately knows everything about dinosaurs and cavemen, and Hogan (Shane Rimmer), the faithful side kick who is the obvious first choice to be dinosaur food.

"The People That Time Forgot" provides the same sort of lousy special effects that plagued "The Land That Time Forgot," but without the non-stop action and adventure that redeemed that first film. Besides, Tyler has ditched Lisa, his paramour from the first film and replaced her with Ajor (Dana Gillespie), a cave woman who probably took the pretty English biologist apart with that big knife. There is no need to watch this sequel out of a sense of completeness to the "story," because you are not going to be happy to the ending. However, pay attention to the Executioner, who is played by David Prowse, who came to this set after having wrapped up a little film called "Star Wars."

Good film
A few years after the happened in Land That Time Forgot, and the navy have returned to the lost world of Caprona to find the missing survivor from the previous film. This carries on its predecessor's trend of strong characters and good storylines - and the monsters are good considering the low budget. It also develops things mentioned in Land, such as the lost island being a living thing with creatures as cells moving through its bloodstream and a volcanic self-defence against any invading viral strains. Certainly well worth watching.


Ultraman Vol.4:Towards the Future
Released in VHS Tape by Cpm/Us Renditions (02 June, 1993)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Andrew Prowse
Average review score:

Ultraman Great- maybe not as great
If you are a Ultraman fan, You may find this a bit stupid. There are several factors which makes Ultraman Great a bit hard to swallow. 1. the story is a bit choppy. 2. some of the dialogue is hard to understand. and finally 3. It just doesn't seem to give Ultraman justice. However if you are a Total Ultraman fan, you just may find a diamond in this rough show.


Ultraman Vol.6:Towards the Future
Released in VHS Tape by Cpm/Us Renditions (17 November, 1993)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Andrew Prowse
Average review score:
No reviews found.

Ultraman Vol.8:Towards the Future
Released in VHS Tape by Cpm/Us Renditions (17 November, 1993)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Andrew Prowse
Average review score:
No reviews found.

Ultraman: Towards the Future 13
Released in VHS Tape by Cpm/Us Renditions (28 December, 1994)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Andrew Prowse
Average review score:
No reviews found.

Related Subjects: VHS Movie Review David-Schwimmer David-Strathairn David-Suchet David-Thewlis Dean-Stockwell Debi-Mazar Deborah-Unger Debra-Monk Debra-Winger Delroy-Lindo Demi-Moore Denis-Leary Denise-Richards Dennis-Farina Dennis-Haysbert Dennis-Hopper Dennis-Miller Dennis-Quaid Denzel-Washington
More Pages: David-Prowse Page 1 2 3