John-Boorman Movie Reviews


Related Subjects: Joaquim-De-Almeida
More Pages: John-Boorman Page 1 2 3
VHS movie reviews for "John-Boorman" sorted by average review score:

Beyond Rangoon
Released in VHS Tape by Columbia Tristar Hom (13 February, 1996)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: John Boorman
Starring: Patricia Arquette
Average review score:

Painful but true
I watched this movie because having just spent 18 months living in Rangoon (Yangon to the Myanmar government at least) I was interested to see how it would be represented in a Hollywood movie. I was impressed by the attention to detail in representing the country, though I doubt very much that it was filmed in Myanmar. The government there doesn't even allow journalists in unless it feels like it, so I think the chances of a film crew being allowed in to make a movie critical of the regime are negligible. That having been said, it was a moving depiction of what did actually happen in 1988 (according to my friends there). Nothing much has changed since then - the government still brooks no criticism of its actions, as its recent treatment of Aung San Suu Kyi demonstrates.
Regarding the plot of the movie, I thought the reason for Patricia Arquette being there was a bit contrived, but apart from that, its excellent production values, solid acting, and convincing script provide a compelling and extremely watchable film.

Expanding our view of freedom
Beyond Rangoon was a tremendous movie. The scenery, dialogue, actor/actress choices, research on Burma and its military dictatorship made for a perfectly paced, informative and enthralling movie. Patricia Arquette was the perfect choice for the female principal role. I enjoyed seeing how pretty Burma was and was scared to know that thousands of people were actually tortured and killed for campaigning for a democratic way of life, without the world knowing until bits of photography was smuggled out. At the close of the movie, the facts scrolled down the screen. My stomach sank as I read how a million people were chased into the jungles because they had a family member or were seen talking with someone involved in protesting the military dictatorship. It reminds me of how luxurious our life is in its lack of fear over government extermination tactics. Anyone would enjoy the beauty of the movie, the wonderful depth of acting, the presentation that while running from trauma a new life can be found as the world expands in viewing. I noted that none of the citizens/residents had any weapon to defend themselves from military intrusion and slaughter. It reminded me that helpless people even in the majority, would have had a better chance if equipped with a simple pistol. Hundreds were gunned down by only a few soldiers while trying to make their escape. It did not end on a depressing note by any means. It ended showing that love of the family is the only possession that really counts and running away from something can provide options if you keep your eyes open.

Profound and moving
My absolute favourite movie.
I can't believe it's still not available on DVD ??! :(


Emerald Forest
Released in VHS Tape by Umvd/Usa Home (23 February, 1999)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: John Boorman
Starring: Powers Boothe and Meg Foster
John Boorman's 1985 South American epic never quite gets all of its gears working simultaneously, but it remains an often startling work with an extraordinary performance by the director's own son, Charley Boorman. Powers Boothe plays an American engineer working on a dam project in Brazil. When his young son is seemingly absorbed one day into the dense perils and beauty of the Amazon rain forest, Boothe's character goes on a protracted, 10-year search for him. In the interim, Boorman puts his full storytelling powers to work by characteristically exploring the arcane rhythms and dangers of an indigenous world hidden from ordinary view. Specifically, Boorman leads us into the life of a forest tribe who have assimilated the missing child and who will ultimately send him back with the opposite of his father's pro-development sensibility. The movie is gorgeous to behold, and it's great fun watching Boorman find ever-novel ways of making the same film again and again. But the environmental message and the emotion of the core relationship get in each other's way a bit, preventing the film from uniting on every front. Still, this is a must for Boorman fans. --Tom Keogh
Average review score:

"Do you know my people?"
John Boorman's "The Emerald Forest" marks the director's return to nature a decade after "Deliverance" (1972). Once again, Boorman so ably captures the essence of the outdoors that it almost becomes a tangible supporting character. Nature in the cinematic world of Boorman is an entity to be revered and feared if you know what is good for you.

Bill Markham (Powers Boothe) is an American engineer who is in Brazil to help oversee the construction of a dam. While inspecting the construction site, tragedy strikes when his young son, Tommy (William Rodriguez) disappears. Haunted by his loss, Markham returns to the rainforest every year for ten years in search of his lost son. He eventually finds the adult Tommy (Charley Boorman) - now know as Tomme - living with the native "Invisible People." As Markham tries to re-establish his relationship with his son, he slowly learns of the devastating ecological and cultural consequences his industrial world has had upon the area.

"The Emerald Forest" sometimes comes across as too heavy-handed in its critique of modern society's threat towards the natural world. Yet, despite its labored message, the film's central story of Markham's searching for his son is involving on an emotional and dramatic level. Furthermore, the scenes with the natives are an insightful venture into an unfamiliar way of life that is as compelling as it is informative. Chalk up "The Emerald Forest" as another little nugget from the Eighties.

Great movie, so-so DVD
Haven't seen this movie for at least 15 years, now it is out on DVD. It is a great movie, about an engineer (Powers Boothe) who was building a dam in Amazon rain forest. His son was kidnapped by lost tribe of the amazon. He searched endlessly for his missing son for 10 years. It is based on true story. The acting is very good and the location is beautiful. Too bad the DVD can't displayed it properly as the color is a bit pale and dark. The sound is Dolby 2.0 only and a bit let down, especially after the DVD opens with the high power MGM logo presented in Dolby 5.1 and when it plays the film, you can immediately feel the drop in the sound quality. But overall it is a very entertaining DVD that worth considering.

This is my favorite movie of all time
The beauty and power of the rainforest juxtaposed to the beauty and power of "civilization," on of my favorite themes. Who is the true savage? Powers Boothe plays a construction engineer building a dam in the rainforest that is increasingly changing the structure of the most valuable real estate on earth. Not only is it effecting the plants and animals, creating desert where there was once rich vegetation, but it is affecting the indigenous tribes in horrendous ways. Charley Boorman plays the beautiful young son who is kidnapped by the leader of the "Invisible People." His father and mother (played by the beautiful Meg Foster) spent the next ten years searching for the boy as he is being raised in tribal customs.

Meanwhile, as the living space for the tribes grows increasingly smaller, the "Invisible People," who are basically good hearted, land loving indigenous people who keep to themselves and only want to survive, are increasingly threatened by the "Fierce People," a carnivorous, cannibalistic tribe who are desperately seeking space for themselves.

We watch Tomme grow up, learn from his new "father" who loves him dearly and was perhaps initially attracted to the tyke's golden blond hair and his own need for a son. We watch Tomme go through a ritual rite of passage that sends him on a dangerous quest for the special green rock that allows what are now his people to become "Invisible." It is in this quest that Tomme and his father cross paths again, and a lesson is learned about the cost of the damage civilization has brought to what is truly a beautiful and rich country better off left alone.

For a long time I couldn't find this movie anywhere. Not even at amazon.com. I cherish the copy I did finally find. I am thrilled to see that it is now available on DVD, but would like to see a DVD created with educational "special features" about the rain forest and the fight to preserve it. That's really what this movie is all about. See it now, before it gets away again.


The Emerald Forest
Released in VHS Tape by Mgm/Ua Studios (01 August, 2000)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: John Boorman
Starring: Powers Boothe and Meg Foster
John Boorman's 1985 South American epic never quite gets all of its gears working simultaneously, but it remains an often startling work with an extraordinary performance by the director's own son, Charley Boorman. Powers Boothe plays an American engineer working on a dam project in Brazil. When his young son is seemingly absorbed one day into the dense perils and beauty of the Amazon rain forest, Boothe's character goes on a protracted, 10-year search for him. In the interim, Boorman puts his full storytelling powers to work by characteristically exploring the arcane rhythms and dangers of an indigenous world hidden from ordinary view. Specifically, Boorman leads us into the life of a forest tribe who have assimilated the missing child and who will ultimately send him back with the opposite of his father's pro-development sensibility. The movie is gorgeous to behold, and it's great fun watching Boorman find ever-novel ways of making the same film again and again. But the environmental message and the emotion of the core relationship get in each other's way a bit, preventing the film from uniting on every front. Still, this is a must for Boorman fans. --Tom Keogh
Average review score:

"Do you know my people?"
John Boorman's "The Emerald Forest" marks the director's return to nature a decade after "Deliverance" (1972). Once again, Boorman so ably captures the essence of the outdoors that it almost becomes a tangible supporting character. Nature in the cinematic world of Boorman is an entity to be revered and feared if you know what is good for you.

Bill Markham (Powers Boothe) is an American engineer who is in Brazil to help oversee the construction of a dam. While inspecting the construction site, tragedy strikes when his young son, Tommy (William Rodriguez) disappears. Haunted by his loss, Markham returns to the rainforest every year for ten years in search of his lost son. He eventually finds the adult Tommy (Charley Boorman) - now know as Tomme - living with the native "Invisible People." As Markham tries to re-establish his relationship with his son, he slowly learns of the devastating ecological and cultural consequences his industrial world has had upon the area.

"The Emerald Forest" sometimes comes across as too heavy-handed in its critique of modern society's threat towards the natural world. Yet, despite its labored message, the film's central story of Markham's searching for his son is involving on an emotional and dramatic level. Furthermore, the scenes with the natives are an insightful venture into an unfamiliar way of life that is as compelling as it is informative. Chalk up "The Emerald Forest" as another little nugget from the Eighties.

Great movie, so-so DVD
Haven't seen this movie for at least 15 years, now it is out on DVD. It is a great movie, about an engineer (Powers Boothe) who was building a dam in Amazon rain forest. His son was kidnapped by lost tribe of the amazon. He searched endlessly for his missing son for 10 years. It is based on true story. The acting is very good and the location is beautiful. Too bad the DVD can't displayed it properly as the color is a bit pale and dark. The sound is Dolby 2.0 only and a bit let down, especially after the DVD opens with the high power MGM logo presented in Dolby 5.1 and when it plays the film, you can immediately feel the drop in the sound quality. But overall it is a very entertaining DVD that worth considering.

This is my favorite movie of all time
The beauty and power of the rainforest juxtaposed to the beauty and power of "civilization," on of my favorite themes. Who is the true savage? Powers Boothe plays a construction engineer building a dam in the rainforest that is increasingly changing the structure of the most valuable real estate on earth. Not only is it effecting the plants and animals, creating desert where there was once rich vegetation, but it is affecting the indigenous tribes in horrendous ways. Charley Boorman plays the beautiful young son who is kidnapped by the leader of the "Invisible People." His father and mother (played by the beautiful Meg Foster) spent the next ten years searching for the boy as he is being raised in tribal customs.

Meanwhile, as the living space for the tribes grows increasingly smaller, the "Invisible People," who are basically good hearted, land loving indigenous people who keep to themselves and only want to survive, are increasingly threatened by the "Fierce People," a carnivorous, cannibalistic tribe who are desperately seeking space for themselves.

We watch Tomme grow up, learn from his new "father" who loves him dearly and was perhaps initially attracted to the tyke's golden blond hair and his own need for a son. We watch Tomme go through a ritual rite of passage that sends him on a dangerous quest for the special green rock that allows what are now his people to become "Invisible." It is in this quest that Tomme and his father cross paths again, and a lesson is learned about the cost of the damage civilization has brought to what is truly a beautiful and rich country better off left alone.

For a long time I couldn't find this movie anywhere. Not even at amazon.com. I cherish the copy I did finally find. I am thrilled to see that it is now available on DVD, but would like to see a DVD created with educational "special features" about the rain forest and the fight to preserve it. That's really what this movie is all about. See it now, before it gets away again.


Point Blank
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (22 June, 1994)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: John Boorman
Starring: Lee Marvin and Angie Dickinson
Walker (Lee Marvin) strides through Los Angeles with the steel-eyed stare of a stone-cold killer, or perhaps a ghost. Betrayed by his wife and best friend, who gun him down point-blank and leave him for dead after a successful heist, Walker blasts his way up the criminal food chain in a quest for revenge. Did he survive the shooting or return from the grave, or is it all a dying dream? The question is left in the air in John Boorman's modern film noir, a brutal revenge thriller based on Richard Stark's novel The Hunter (remade by Brian Helgeland as Payback), set in the impersonal concrete and steel canyons of Los Angeles and eerily empty cells of Alcatraz. Walker kills without remorse, guided by shadowy "informant" Keenan Wynn, whose own agenda is carefully concealed, and assisted by Angie Dickinson, as he desperately searches for someone, anyone, who can just give him his money. But if Walker is an extreme incarnation of the revenge-driven noir antihero, the modern syndicate has been transformed into a world of paper jungles and corporate businessmen, an alienating concept to the two-fisted, gun-wielding gangster. Boorman creates a hard, austere look for the film and fragments the story with flashes of painful memory, grafting the New Wave onto old genres with confidence and style. Haunting and brutal, Point Blank remains one of the most distinctive crime thrillers ever made. --Sean Axmaker
Average review score:

Not a classic but still pretty good
Most people view this as being a classic however in my view it does not quite meet those standards. Having read the novels for such a long time and watching the action unfold to be precise disapointment was one word and awe another. Watching Marvin as Walker a thief who plays himself as wanting no blood on his hands he charges through the criminal under world with an unmatched temper. Seeking out the friend who double crossed and the wife who became his lover. Playing off as a Parker character he does it great through the acting but the action is missing a few pages. As the cold blooded Walker he does not even kill anyone rather he just forces them around. Which did not settle well with me as a reader of the novels as stated above this lead to me believe that Hollywood wanted a movie which would not offend. It makes me beg the question of why produce is anyway. High caliber actors and a great assortment of characters dot this story of a man seeking his claims but why edit the violence from the novel? Making his character like a declawed kitten however he is they do however redeem themselves. Marvin walks into a bathroom ambush and walks out leaving two bleeding and injured hitmen behind. On top of that he managed to play the character to a near Gibson like... well if you can call it that standard. Boorman directed this and he did an okay job there are things which could have been improved. Stylish film noir does not quite fit this as a tag line rather it's more of a PI story laced with the criminal elements over the noir factors. Get Payback done better and with a more cold static feeling.

An undeniable CLASSIC
John Boorman's first "American" film, Point Blank still influences filmmakers, such as Martin Scorsese, to this day. Lee Marvin, in one of his best performances, stars as Walker, a man who seemingly comes back from the dead to seek revenge on the friend who betrayed him and recover the 93 grand that he was cheated out of. Walker is pure momentum, a relentless driving force that is virtually unstoppable. He acts almost like anti-matter, his mere presence on the scene causes the world around him, and the people in it, to fall apart. John Boorman based his concept of the character on Lee Marvin's screen persona and certain aspects of his real personality. Angie Dickinson is transcendentally HOT, John Vernon makes his screen debut, Keenan Wynn and Carol O'Connor do great work. Point Blank has a unique, modernistic style all its own - part Antonioni, part Kiss of Death, part science fiction ghost story. Current action films pale in comparrison. Stay away from the crappy remake starring Melvin Gibson and watch POINTY BLANK instead. "You're a very bad man, Walker!"

I want this on DVD
There are plenty of reviews here so I'll skip the synopsis. John Boorman crafted a unique revenge film from the pulp novel it's based on. The novel itself is standard revenge fare but the film strays from that to create a world where the dead can take revenge just by sheer will. Walker, in the film, doesn't actually kill anyone because he's a ghost. He just cause it to happen. I saw a wide screen version on TCM the other night so I don't see why they can't release it on DVD. Somebody make them do it. Please.


Hell in the Pacific
Released in VHS Tape by Twentieth Century Fox (21 November, 1991)
MPAA Rating: G (General Audience)
Director: John Boorman
Starring: Lee Marvin and Toshirô Mifune
Lone Japanese soldier Toshiro Mifune diligently scans the ocean from his island lookout as he must have thousands of times before, but this time he spies an abandoned life raft resting on a rocky bluff. Within minutes he's face to face with American sea-wreck survivor Lee Marvin and the two begin an elaborate game of cat and mouse. Director John Boorman presents this two-man war as a deadly game between a pair of overgrown children, who finally tire of it (as kids will) and settle into tolerated co-existence and then even something resembling a friendship. With impressionistic strokes, Boorman paints a lush tropical paradise in colors you can drink from the screen, capturing the texture of their experience as refracted through the cinema: the look of the island as seen through the haze of smoke, the sound of a sudden rainstorm as it hushes the island in a calming roar, the timelessness of life outside of civilization. The story seems almost secondary, an allegorical drama that comes alive in the excellent performances by Marvin and Mifune (who soon enough converse despite their complete inability to understand each other's language) and the visceral immediacy of Boorman's gorgeous widescreen images. Hell in the Pacific is not a tale told as much as a film experienced. --Sean Axmaker
Average review score:

One of the weirder war movies I've seen
It's been a long time since I saw this on the big screen (I was in my teens), but I remember a few vivid images of this intense drama of two men, one American, one Japanese, stranded together on a tiny Pacific island. Although bitter enemies, the y each go through a transformation of character and purpose, forced upon them by their harsh circumstances. In a way, the film is as much a commentary on how mankind can get along, or how we can destroy each other, depending on which way the wind blows (literally, here). Parts of the movie seem to drag on with little development, while others are rich in humor, sadness, violence, and characterization. I didn't like the ending, as it seemed pointless. However, that may well be the message of the entire movie.

The Best of Enemies
This review refers to the Anchor Bay DVD "Hell in the Pacific"...

You won't find a big ensemble cast in this World War II film from 1968. Only 2 actors tell the story, and they don't even speak the same langauge. But they don't need to, these two actors are Lee Marvin and Toshiro Mifune. They portray enemies, one American, one Japanese, marooned on an island in the midst of the war. They are so brillant in their portrayals, that actions really do speak louder than words. You won't even miss the fact that there are no subtitles when Mifune is speaking. His every expression, lets us know exactly what he is thinking.
Add to this the artful direction of John Boorman, who brought us such exquiste films as "Excalibur", the wonderful music of Lalo Schifrin (Mission Impossible), and the expert eye of Cinematographer Conrad Hall(Butch Cassidy, American Beauty) and you're in for a real cinematic treat.

When a disciplined Japanese Naval Officer discovers he is not alone on the small Island in the Pacific, he immediatly goes into high gear to protect and defend his territory. But he has met his match in the very undisciplined American Marine that has been washed ashore. And so it begins...these two do everything they can to capture, torture, and generally make life miserable for each other(and at times is on the comical side). The need for human contact though, becomes apparent and they stop short at killing each other, and actually form an attachment to each other. The ending is a bit of a shocker, but there is also an alternate ending included with this DVD.

Anchor Bay as usual has really made this 35 year old film a pleasure to watch. You have the choice of widescreen(2.35:1) or full format(by the way, my DVD was mismarked as to which side was widescreen, so don't panic if this happens, just flip it over). Excellent picture, vibrant colors and the sound in Dolby Dig Stereo is clear as a bell. And don't forget to check out the alternate ending.

A great buy for fans of war movies, Marvin and Mifune, and anyone who appreciates artful film making.

Enjoy....Laurie

Island life
This is in my top 10 of all time.
I watched this movie - heres what blew me away.
1. minimal use of soundtrack - breathing of the actors is enough to convey thirst, fear, hate - I cant tell you how much I appreciated the nuances - something lost in todays movies - which is why this stands from the pack

2. minimal script - words fail to tell the story

3. cinematography - artistically right on

4. character studies - of characters that are believable and interesting. I did not find find Marvins character to be any less so than Mifunes. Marvin played the stereotype well and so did Mifune. Characteristics are nuanced as well.

5. alternative ending was very satisfying - in reality the alternative ending would have been more likely.


Excalibur
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (11 August, 1982)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: John Boorman
Starring: Nigel Terry and Helen Mirren
This lush retelling of the legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table is a dark and engrossing tale. Director John Boorman (Deliverance) masterfully handles the tale of the mythical sword Excalibur, and its passing from the wizard Merlin to the future king of England. Arthur pulls the famed sword from a stone and is destined to be crowned king. As the king embarks on a passionate love affair with Guenevere, an illegitimate son, and Merlin's designs on power, threaten Arthur's reign. The film is visually stunning and unflinching in its scenes of combat and black magic. Featuring an impressive supporting cast, including early work from the likes of Liam Neeson and Gabriel Byrne, Excalibur is an adaptation of the legend both faithful and bold. --Robert Lane
Average review score:

Not Perfect, But Darn Close...
It's tough to compress the 900-some-odd pages of text that Thomas Malory used to tell his story of Le Morte d'Arthur into 140 minutes, but director John Boorman and screenwriter Rospo Pallenberg give it a good shot. While it sometimes leaves out important details or compresses events in the interest of time, it can never be accused of playing fast and loose with the legend. However, the film also requires a bit of work on the part of the viewer to fill in some of the details, and it's obvious Boorman expects his viewer to be at least passing familiar with the traditions of the Arthurian legend (anyone unfamiliar with the mythology associated with Avalon, for example, may be baffled by the imagery in the film's closing moments).

With its darkened, cloud-streaked skies, lonely stone castles, eerie green lighting, (all caught in beautiful widescreen glory on the DVD!) and use of the music of Richard Wagner, you won't find a moodier, more beautifully shot film. In fact, there are some downright breathtaking cinematic moments in this film -- from the wedding of Arthur and Guinevere (complete with medieval chants and armor polished to a mirror-like sheen) to the Lady of the Lake's clean catch of Excalibur over the swooshing music of Wagner. Great stuff.

While Nicol Williamson turns in a very game performance as Merlin, it's Nigel Terry who carries the film in an underappreciated but wholly believeable interpretation of King Arthur. Terry leaves the scenery-chewing to Williamson, and anchors the film instead with a steady, understated performance. Look also for stars-in-the-making Liam Neeson as the jealous Gawain, and Patrick Stewart as Guenevere's father, Leodegrance.

EXCALIBUR has all the elements one expects in a fantasy; yet, in a sense, Boorman does for the sword-and-sorcery film what Sergio Leone did for the western: whereas prior horse operas showed cowboys riding across the desert and shuffing down dirt streets without a bit of sweat, and firing pistols that never drew blood, Leone made everyone look hot and sweaty, and showed that a Smith & Wesson could rip a real hole through your gut. Boorman does the same for the knight in this film -- knights clunk around clumsily in heavy armor, get skewered on pikes, get their heads bashed in, and cough their guts out in bloody mud puddles. It all lends an air of veracity to the film that makes it all seem like It Could Really Have Happened This Way.

The widescreen format available on DVD gives this film the weight and heft it has long deserved, and there are some real gems lurking among the additional features -- a surprisingly cheezy, Grade B trailer, and a really great alternate soundtrack in which director John Boorman discusses the action and shares some behind-the-scene goodies (such as the fact that Nicol Williamson and Helen Mirren couldn't stand each other, or that the actor playing the teenaged Mordred was actually a first-rate horseman).

Fantastic
I am not an Arthurian legend stickler and I have no qualms about the details of the film. 'Excalibur' is pure entertainment. It is an epic: the acting, plot, scenery, musical score and moral themes blend together seamlessly. Simply a thoroughly and completely fantastic movie; indeed in the genre of fantasy I have seen no equal (that includes the LoTR). This Wagnerian masterpiece is definitely one for the collection.

SPELLBOUND
OH, yes indeeed - this is one for all ages, beautifully cast, costumed, photographed, etc. etc. etc.

FASCINATING TO WATCH after two decades is it? [and we make such a fuss over the current "Ring Cycle"] This one's also pre-CGI - and such splendor.

New faces of that time include Gabriel Byrne and Liam Neeson - but it's the brilliance of Nicol Williamson and Merlin and Helen Mirren as Morgana that impress and continue to impress.

A rare treat for myth lovers!

[Great 'repeat' shots - the Lady of the Lake vs Mr. Boorman's shotgun holding hand in 'Deliverance' and for more fun there's always ZARDOZ!]


Hope and Glory
Released in VHS Tape by Mgm/Ua Studios (01 August, 2000)
MPAA Rating: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Director: John Boorman
Starring: Sarah Miles and David Hayman
This winning 1987 epic written and directed by John Boorman (Deliverance, The General) serves as a picaresque and semi-autobiographical remembrance of a boy's coming of age during the Second World War. Exhibiting a defiant and humorous take on life during the London blitz, the family of the young boy at the center of the story (Sebastian Rice-Edwards) is a close-knit and resilient bunch, undeterred in the face of the war and reveling in each other even as they hide from the incessant bombing. To be sure, there are some poignant moments in this childhood reminiscence, such as when the boy's older sister (Sammi Davis) falls in love with a Canadian, becomes pregnant, and marries him, only to see him taken away by the military police. And the boy's mother (Sarah Miles) serves as a strong influence in the boy's life as she leads her family through this tumultuous time. The majestic sweep of the film is contrasted with so many comic moments as the people in town go about the mundane details of their daily lives yet also engage in the most absurd rituals in dealing with the onslaught of German artillery, from taking the air raids for granted to wearing gas masks at school. Boorman doesn't dwell on the horrors of war; instead he celebrates the richness and resilience of the people he remembers so fondly. An adventurous and nostalgic slice of life, Hope and Glory is a superb and memorable film. --Robert Lane
Average review score:

if i could give it no stars i would
having to watch with school for english classes was like watching plants grow hair. it has absolutley no story line what so ever and it is absolute dribble, john boorman wasted a lot of time making a film about.. practicly nothing. sure it gives us a taste of what it was like in world war two but it has no point, no plot, and nothing interesting to look at. i have to agree with mike that giving yourself an enema with a garden hose would probly be alot more enjoyable than watching this crap. dont waste your time and money looking in at other peoples lives, its got no relavence what so ever, go out and do somthing usefull, like make a film people will actually enjoy watching

Oh....Oh....OHHHHH Fudge!!
Mortifying. I can't even put into words how annoyingly bad this film was. I'd rather be forced to drink 10 week old fryolator grease from a seafood restaurant than have to watch this film again. It's the equivilant of having your genitals smashed repeatedly with a toffee hammer.

I've had cold sores that I've been happier with than this drivel. Please, life is too precious to waste it on this. I plead with you...it would be better if you gave yourself an enema with a garden hose than view this film.

Nuff said...

One of my favorite WW 2 movies!
As a person that loves books set in WW 2, I almost knew that I would love "Hope and Glory." The movie by John Boorman tells the story of seven year old Billy Rohan (Sevastian Rice Edwards) and the coming of the second world war changes his whole world. Also in the cast is Sarah Mills and Sami Davis(who would be on the ABC show Homefront, about post WW2 America) This is one of my favorite movies that I enjoy watching over and over.


Deliverance
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (08 May, 2001)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: John Boorman
Starring: Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, and Ned Beatty
One of the key films of the 1970s, John Boorman's Deliverance is a nightmarish adaptation of poet-novelist James Dickey's book about various kinds of survival in modern America. The story concerns four Atlanta businessmen of various male stripe: Jon Voight's character is a reflective, civilized fellow, Burt Reynolds plays a strapping hunter-gatherer in urban clothes, Ned Beatty is a sweaty, weak-willed boy-man, and Ronny Cox essays a spirited, neighborly type. Together they decide to answer the ancient call of men testing themselves against the elements and set out on a treacherous ride on the rapids of an Appalachian river. What they don't understand until it is too late is that they have ventured into Dickey's variation on the American underbelly, a wild, lawless, dangerous (and dangerously inbred) place isolated from the gloss of the late 20th century. In short order, the four men dig deep into their own suppressed primitiveness, defending themselves against armed cretins, facing the shock of real death on their carefully planned, death-defying adventure, and then squarely facing the suspicions of authority over their concealed actions. Boorman, a master teller of stories about individuals on peculiarly mythical journeys, does a terrifying and beautiful job of revealing the complexity of private and collective character--the way one can never be the same after glimpsing the sharp-clawed survivor in one's soul. --Tom Keogh
Average review score:

Terrific, violent and distressing thriller!
In 1972, the English filmmaker John Boorman ("Excalibur", "Hope and Glory") accomplished one of the most contusing and acclaimed dramas of Hollywood history.Based on James Dickey's original best-selling novel, Deliverance is a vigorous picture about the human cruelty directed with mastery by Boorman, who substituted the original profesional chosen to make the film, Sam Peckinpah. Dickey also worked on the movie (and he even has a small part as a sheriff), helping to give the correct contours and maintaining the fidelity to his shocking book: four friends, common and hard-working citizens, decide to spend the weekend challenging the dangerous and fast rapidses of the "last unpolluted river in Georgia".Worst is what waits for them in the margins. Starting from the moment in which they arrive in the mountains, the confusion with the eccentric hillbillies gets announced and explodes later into mutilation, murder and rape. After Voight and Beatty are assaulted by two hillbillies, comes one of the most distressing cinematography's sequences ,Ned Beatty under the power and strength of a sick local's inhabitant .Then, Reynolds kills one of the homosexuals, and the other scapes, this is the point in which Boorman sets inside that hostile and natural enviroment a type of "primitive" tribunal. This is the most frightening moment: what should they do?hide the body, kill the other mountain man who fled, and pretend that nothing happened, deceiving the authorities, or go to the police, admit the crime and take the risk that resides in a possible trial? the dignity and the heart of each character will be tested!Burt Reynolds gives an outstanding performance and, perhaps, the best of his career, as a man obsessed by adventure who will do to everything to survive,but the most astonishing and brave acting belongs to Ned Beatty,terrific as a poor overweight salesman who receives the most impressive punishment by the hillbillies. Agile, violent, and extremely dramatic, this thriller is powerful and courageous.

Life lessons from John Boorman's best work
Four city-boy businessmen unwittingly take themselves on a canoe trip to barbarity along a remote river in Georgia. Adapted from the magnificent novel by James Dickey, "Deliverance" employs the river and the surrounding forest as brutal devices to gradually strip its pampered characters of all traces of civilization so that they, and we, can learn what lies beneath their cultural facades. What are we capable of doing in the absence of structured society, when we must answer only to ourselves? John Boorman shot this movie in sequence, and there's a powerful sense of progression along the cruel river. The actors, the film crew and the audience are all transported relentlessly from the light into a Conrad-like heart of darkness. It's up to each of us to see what we can discover by the time we emerge. The character Lewis, portrayed in a fine performance by Burt Reynolds, concisely sets the stage with "Sometimes you have to lose yourself before you can find anything." Macho poet Dickey collaborated tempestuously but productively with Boorman to bring this wonderful work to the screen. Neither of them ever surpassed "Deliverance" and it must surely rank as one of the best movies ever made. To learn more about Dickey, the novel, and the film, see the recent book "Summer of Deliverance" by his equally talented son, Christopher. I would also recommend that the film be viewed as a double bill with Spielberg's "Duel", which replaces Dickey's river with a monstrous truck on the backroads of California.

De De Ding der Ding der Ding der Ding...
Deliverance is an incredibly powerful movie. That it has lived so long in the cultural memory is testament to both its power and its beauty. While by no means a cult film, it does maintain a certain hold over people, especially city folk who are naturally mistrustful of the rural environment anyway.
The story revolves around a bunch of city boys who set out to do some white-water canoeing down a river that's about to be flooded forever, and the difficulties they encounter along the way, with the natural environment and with their fellow men.
It is easy to become swept up in the controversy surrounding certain parts of this movie, but to concentrate on the more unforgettable scenes does an injustice to the vision of the writer and director as a whole. Together they create a reality that is at once both intimately familiar and yet frighteningly alien. If you go into this movie expecting 2 hours of edge-of-your-seat thrills, you'll be sadly disappointed. The movie takes its time to build a feeling of eeriness and beauty and for long periods of time all that happens is the guys battling the river, beautiful shots of the Georgia wilderness and a wonderful reminder of how great "The Great Outdoors" can be.
The movie really begins to find its voice when the freakish mountain people are encountered. The people and the culture are so outside of the experience of an average urban, amazon.com user that it becomes gripping, terrifying and ultimately essential viewing.

The movie raises some brilliant and disturbing questions about morality, trust and what it means to be a human being.
If you haven't seen Deliverance, I highly recommend you waste no time and go see it now, if you like visually stunning, challenging and thought provoking-movies. And yes, the "dueling banjos" scene is simply one of the best 5 minutes of movie history ever!
Also available is a 25th Anniversary version of this film. My complaint with this is that it includes a "The Making of" feature which, while being informative and fascinating (did you know the actors lived on the river and did all their own stunts and no-one would insure it?) on the VHS edition it is included at the start of the tape - before the film!!! I recommend you fast-forward through this and come back to it later, as it contains some spoiler you'd rather not see. Also included is the original theatrical trailer, which is of great historical interest. Watch it and you will see what I mean!


Deliverance (Widescreen Edition)
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (08 May, 2001)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: John Boorman
Starring: Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, and Ned Beatty
One of the key films of the 1970s, John Boorman's Deliverance is a nightmarish adaptation of poet-novelist James Dickey's book about various kinds of survival in modern America. The story concerns four Atlanta businessmen of various male stripe: Jon Voight's character is a reflective, civilized fellow, Burt Reynolds plays a strapping hunter-gatherer in urban clothes, Ned Beatty is a sweaty, weak-willed boy-man, and Ronny Cox essays a spirited, neighborly type. Together they decide to answer the ancient call of men testing themselves against the elements and set out on a treacherous ride on the rapids of an Appalachian river. What they don't understand until it is too late is that they have ventured into Dickey's variation on the American underbelly, a wild, lawless, dangerous (and dangerously inbred) place isolated from the gloss of the late 20th century. In short order, the four men dig deep into their own suppressed primitiveness, defending themselves against armed cretins, facing the shock of real death on their carefully planned, death-defying adventure, and then squarely facing the suspicions of authority over their concealed actions. Boorman, a master teller of stories about individuals on peculiarly mythical journeys, does a terrifying and beautiful job of revealing the complexity of private and collective character--the way one can never be the same after glimpsing the sharp-clawed survivor in one's soul. --Tom Keogh
Average review score:

Terrific, violent and distressing thriller!
In 1972, the English filmmaker John Boorman ("Excalibur", "Hope and Glory") accomplished one of the most contusing and acclaimed dramas of Hollywood history.Based on James Dickey's original best-selling novel, Deliverance is a vigorous picture about the human cruelty directed with mastery by Boorman, who substituted the original profesional chosen to make the film, Sam Peckinpah. Dickey also worked on the movie (and he even has a small part as a sheriff), helping to give the correct contours and maintaining the fidelity to his shocking book: four friends, common and hard-working citizens, decide to spend the weekend challenging the dangerous and fast rapidses of the "last unpolluted river in Georgia".Worst is what waits for them in the margins. Starting from the moment in which they arrive in the mountains, the confusion with the eccentric hillbillies gets announced and explodes later into mutilation, murder and rape. After Voight and Beatty are assaulted by two hillbillies, comes one of the most distressing cinematography's sequences ,Ned Beatty under the power and strength of a sick local's inhabitant .Then, Reynolds kills one of the homosexuals, and the other scapes, this is the point in which Boorman sets inside that hostile and natural enviroment a type of "primitive" tribunal. This is the most frightening moment: what should they do?hide the body, kill the other mountain man who fled, and pretend that nothing happened, deceiving the authorities, or go to the police, admit the crime and take the risk that resides in a possible trial? the dignity and the heart of each character will be tested!Burt Reynolds gives an outstanding performance and, perhaps, the best of his career, as a man obsessed by adventure who will do to everything to survive,but the most astonishing and brave acting belongs to Ned Beatty,terrific as a poor overweight salesman who receives the most impressive punishment by the hillbillies. Agile, violent, and extremely dramatic, this thriller is powerful and courageous.

Life lessons from John Boorman's best work
Four city-boy businessmen unwittingly take themselves on a canoe trip to barbarity along a remote river in Georgia. Adapted from the magnificent novel by James Dickey, "Deliverance" employs the river and the surrounding forest as brutal devices to gradually strip its pampered characters of all traces of civilization so that they, and we, can learn what lies beneath their cultural facades. What are we capable of doing in the absence of structured society, when we must answer only to ourselves? John Boorman shot this movie in sequence, and there's a powerful sense of progression along the cruel river. The actors, the film crew and the audience are all transported relentlessly from the light into a Conrad-like heart of darkness. It's up to each of us to see what we can discover by the time we emerge. The character Lewis, portrayed in a fine performance by Burt Reynolds, concisely sets the stage with "Sometimes you have to lose yourself before you can find anything." Macho poet Dickey collaborated tempestuously but productively with Boorman to bring this wonderful work to the screen. Neither of them ever surpassed "Deliverance" and it must surely rank as one of the best movies ever made. To learn more about Dickey, the novel, and the film, see the recent book "Summer of Deliverance" by his equally talented son, Christopher. I would also recommend that the film be viewed as a double bill with Spielberg's "Duel", which replaces Dickey's river with a monstrous truck on the backroads of California.

De De Ding der Ding der Ding der Ding...
Deliverance is an incredibly powerful movie. That it has lived so long in the cultural memory is testament to both its power and its beauty. While by no means a cult film, it does maintain a certain hold over people, especially city folk who are naturally mistrustful of the rural environment anyway.
The story revolves around a bunch of city boys who set out to do some white-water canoeing down a river that's about to be flooded forever, and the difficulties they encounter along the way, with the natural environment and with their fellow men.
It is easy to become swept up in the controversy surrounding certain parts of this movie, but to concentrate on the more unforgettable scenes does an injustice to the vision of the writer and director as a whole. Together they create a reality that is at once both intimately familiar and yet frighteningly alien. If you go into this movie expecting 2 hours of edge-of-your-seat thrills, you'll be sadly disappointed. The movie takes its time to build a feeling of eeriness and beauty and for long periods of time all that happens is the guys battling the river, beautiful shots of the Georgia wilderness and a wonderful reminder of how great "The Great Outdoors" can be.
The movie really begins to find its voice when the freakish mountain people are encountered. The people and the culture are so outside of the experience of an average urban, amazon.com user that it becomes gripping, terrifying and ultimately essential viewing.

The movie raises some brilliant and disturbing questions about morality, trust and what it means to be a human being.
If you haven't seen Deliverance, I highly recommend you waste no time and go see it now, if you like visually stunning, challenging and thought provoking-movies. And yes, the "dueling banjos" scene is simply one of the best 5 minutes of movie history ever!
Also available is a 25th Anniversary version of this film. My complaint with this is that it includes a "The Making of" feature which, while being informative and fascinating (did you know the actors lived on the river and did all their own stunts and no-one would insure it?) on the VHS edition it is included at the start of the tape - before the film!!! I recommend you fast-forward through this and come back to it later, as it contains some spoiler you'd rather not see. Also included is the original theatrical trailer, which is of great historical interest. Watch it and you will see what I mean!


Beyond Rangoon
Released in VHS Tape by Castle Rock (02 June, 1998)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: John Boorman
Starring: Patricia Arquette

Related Subjects: Joaquim-De-Almeida
More Pages: John-Boorman Page 1 2 3