Liam-Neeson Movie Reviews


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VHS movie reviews for "Liam-Neeson" sorted by average review score:

Coral Reef Adventure
Released in Theatrical Release by (14 February, 2003)
MPAA Rating:
Director: Greg MacGillivray
Average review score:

Can't wait for the DVD!!!
In the tradition of The Living Sea, they've done it again. A great IMAX film that will make you think about the ocean and how to protect it...

Endangered coral reefs exposed for all to see
I may be a bit biased- as I have dived all the reefs shown in this movie, and have enjoyed diving in Fiji with Rusi Vulakoro, focus of the film (and expect to dive with Rusi again November 2003). The footage is superb- showing Australia's enormous Great Barrier Reef, French Polynesia's Rangiroa Atoll (with a huge school of about 300 grey whalers / grey reef sharks) and lots of Fiji's world-class reefs- from its spectacular soft corals to the eutrophication of a once-vital reef just offshore to one of Fiji's islands. One even sees how the huge IMAX camera is maneuvered in "Rangi's" stiff currents, as well as in 107 meters / 350 feet of depth as cinematographer Howard Hall and scientist Richard Pyle discover fish completely new to science, using CIS Lunar Mark 4-P rebreathers.

The sound track is excellent, the footage outstanding, and the explanation of why coral reefs are failing, while basic, is quite accurate: overfishing of reef inhabitants, silt from logging and development, and waters warmed by the global warming some still deny and the El Niño / Southern Oscillation phenomenon.

Unfortunately gone missing in the simplification are fishing for aquarium specimens and food fish with cyanide, dynamite fishing, coral removal for various commercial schemes, and inflow of insecticides and fertilizers, as on barrier reefs off Australia and Central America. And some explanations and scenes are, shall we say, a little bit "embellished" up for effect... but in the end, this is an awesome movie. Divers will love it, those who do not dive will begin to get an idea of why we who do actually dive and travel to such wonderful places. Those concerned about reefs' well-being will be gratified there is some information how people can help conserve reefs, with some prominent mention being given to NGO Reef Check and its activities involving sport divers.

If you enjoy underwater film, this is a "MUST SEE". A very good supporting book (Living Mirrors: A Coral Reef Adventure, by Jack Stephens, Umbrage Editions, ISBN 1-8844167-26-8) is available, and Coral Reef Adventure is also available- with difficulty at this time- in VHS and DVD editions.

Outstanding!
This was an outstanding movie. Beautifully filmed, it not only entertained, but also educated as well. My seven and eight year old loved it, too. Great music, great scenery, great movie!!


A Woman of Substance (Boxed Set)
Released in VHS Tape by Acorn Media (31 August, 1999)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Starring: Seagrove, Neeson, Bostwick, Kerr, and Liam Neeson
Determined to ruin the upper-class Fairley family who wronged her, Emma Harte (Jenny Seagrove) aims to become one of the richest women in the world. Although anachronistic for a woman born around 1890, it is exhilarating to watch her think and act like a contemporary woman with the benefits of late-20th-century feminism. In just over five hours, this Emmy-nominated version of Barbara Taylor Bradford's bestselling novel A Woman of Substance traces Emma's life from overworked Yorkshire maid to the triumphant 79-year-old matriarch (Deborah Kerr) of a vast business empire.

Married twice, but only truly loving a man she could never marry, Emma devotes herself to building her business empire. Surrounded by a loyal few, including Irishman Blackie O'Neill (Liam Neeson), Emma lives her life as a strong, uncompromising protagonist similar to Gone with the Wind's Scarlett O'Hara in a social environment reminiscent of Upstairs, Downstairs. Her life is a sort of feminist retrospective on the social issues of 1890s-to-1930s England--poverty, illegitimate children, illness, anti-Semitism, World War I, whether to marry for security or passion, the role of women in the workplace, and such--making A Woman of Substance a historical and inspiring film to watch. --Tara Chace

Average review score:

Wonderful, keeps you involved. You want Emma to achieve.
I loved this movie, you can feel Emma's pain and indignation and you want her to succeed and grow out of her surroundings. She has ambition & pride that we all wish we had. A very courageous woman.

Think You Can't Make It
The protrayal of Emma Harte in the movie A Woman of Substance, shows the viewer the struggle of a young teenage girl and the trials of growing up, the events of struggling to make a stand as a young business woman and mother and the endurance over the years to the become the pinnacle of greatness. This was an excellent movie. It helped me regain inner strength that my trials and struggles can be conquered. The only thing I wish was brought out more, was the different ages Emma was throughout the movie. It would help the viewer know at what age Emma was at during different segments of her life.

great !!
A very good and entertaining story. Great acting by Jenny Seagrove and Deborah Kerr.

I must however, remain skeptical of how such things could actually place in conservative Victorian Britain, before WWI.

After all, in more liberal U.S., the women's lib movement didn't take place until 1960s and 1970s


If Tomorrow Comes
Released in VHS Tape by Anchor Bay Entertainment (30 September, 1997)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Jerry London
Average review score:

If Tomorrow Comes - my favorite movie
If Tomorrow Comes (directed by Jerry London) is the kind of movie one can watch many times, over and over again. It has all the wonderful ingredients of a great movie: beautiful and charming heroine, great cast, interesting and intriguing plot, international scene and romance.I love to watch Tracy Whitney travel from New Orleans to New York and then to London, Verona, Paris and Amsterdam. The settings are exquisite and her gowns are beautiful too. Great choice of music scores. The dialogue is charming and witty. Great cast includes Madolyn Smith, Tom Berenger and Liam Neeson. It's a great pleasure to watch a woman who is beatiful, intelligent, charming and kind - an amazing heroine.
It's a great movie and I'm surprised that it's not available through video rentals and stores. First time I saw this movie was in the 80s in Europe and when I came to North America, I was trying to find this film andI finally found it in Amazon's zShops. It's was great to know that I can find great films through zShops that are not available through Blockbusters of the world.
This movie is based on Sidney Sheldon's book If Tomorrow Comes and he's my favorite writer. This movie is as good as his books.
I would recommend this movie to everybody to watch and enjoy like I do.

A delightful romantic thriller which is sorely missed
After reading Sidney Sheldon's novel which this movie was based upon, I eagerly anticipated watching this mini-series on television. Of course, sometimes after reading the book, the movie doesn't live up to expectations. After watching this mini-series, I wasn't disappointed! The movie was very entertaining, well written and directed. Madolyn Smith did a wonderful job in the lead and Tom Berenger was equally charming. The chemistry between them was wonderful!

This movie is very rarely re-shown on TV and since I haven't seen the full version since the original broadcast aired in 1987, I was very disappointed to see it is no longer being produced.

Hopefully there will be enough fans out there to convince the studio to re-release it. I hope my e-mail to the studio to re-release it will help. Hopefully more reviewers will also request a re-release from the studio and they will re-release it on video and/or DVD! Until then, I will keep searching the auctions and crossing my fingers!

Sidney Sheldon does it again!!!!
The only missing part of this highly entertaining miniseries version of Sidney Sheldon's bestselling book is the "Queen of th Miniseries, Jaclyn Smith." Though same last name star,Madolyn Smith is not too bad in the title role. Actually, she's good at it.

Enjoyable all through out. No dull moments and the very young Tom Berenger's never been sexier.

Cant wait to see the dvd version!


The Good Mother
Released in VHS Tape by Walt Disney Home Video (04 June, 2002)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Leonard Nimoy
Starring: Diane Keaton and Liam Neeson
Average review score:

So Powerful, So Wonderful
I was warned before watching this movie that it would not be one of those 'sit in front of the television with a bowl of popcorn' movies. For half of the movie, I just sat there, my eyes glued to the screen, watching Diane Keaton in a simply wonderful and dramatic role.

Anna Dunlap (Keaton) is a newly divorced woman with an adorable six year old daughter. They have a wonderful relationship, and it is very evident when you sit down and watch them together. Enter Liam Neeson. He starts out as a person with whom you would not want to get to know, but after a few minutes, he reveals that he's just in a bad mood and he is actually quite nice. When he first meets Molly (the very adorable Asia Vieira), she is very shy towards him, but she learns to like him and you can see that there is a bond between them. When something happens (I don't want to say what), and Molly's father wants full-time custody of her, the movie becomes a full-blown drama. It is, I admit, hard to watch some of the courtroom scenes, but they are so powerful and they draw you into the story. In a way, I saw the end result coming, but not exactly like it did. It definitely showed finality in the family.

Keaton's performace, like I said above, was incredibly powerful and she does a wonderful job portraying Molly's mother. The main reason I bought this movie was because of Diane Keaton, since she is my favorite actress and this movie shows her in her best dramatic role, in my opinion. If only it had received higher reviews when it came out. But I go by what looks good to me, and to me, this looked good, mainly because of the cast and the story.

Simply a must-see
Being a tremendous fan of Diane Keaton's work, I rented this movie (I'm still... that this movie isn't sold anywhere), and it immediately rated as one of my top-ten favorite Keaton videos. It honestly is an enigma that this movie didn't get enough praise it deserves. Most of the scenes are incredibly sweet, warm, and intimate. That's what makes this movie so great. When Keaton's character, Anna, meets Liam Neeson's character, Leo, there's a unmistakable bond forming. I especially love the scene when Anna goes to Leo's apartment and Leo and Anna becomes one, dancing in front of Leo's sculpture, making shadows on the wall from the light shining on them from behind. This is an esoteric concept of first love. I really thought it was so sweet when Anna confessed to Leo that she thought she wasn't very good at sex, and he gently assures her that they can fix that. There's no judgment in that scene;it's obvious that Leo really loves Anna, and their love is vivid. Another favorite scene is when Anna and her daughter, Molly, are in the bathtub with Leo reading to them. This is truly intimate, and I just love the fact that they were so open-minded about being naked in front of Molly. There's just so much tenderness and love. It was, to me, beautiful. And yet another favorite scene is when Molly has a bad dream and goes into Anna's room while she and Leo are making love, and they comfort her until she falls asleep.There's another display of intimacy, about caring and love. The three of them together was absolutely wonderful. That is why I found it incredibly appalling that Anna's ex-husband, Brian, goes to court for something that happened between Molly and Leo that had absoluely no intention of happening. (I won't ruin the ending for you). But I found the ending truly sad and final. A soon-to-be family are wrenched apart by an innocent mistake. I felt bad, because I knew they could have had a wonderful life together. I also felt bad for Anna and Leo. I could really see their love shown for each other. They were so comfortable together; their feelings for each other were vivid and beautiful. This is a movie of non-judgment and unconditional love, and that's what makes it so special. I honestly don't understand why this movie was considered a failure. Keaton is at her best in this movie, and Neeson is simply wonderful. I consider myself as an efficient movie critic, and I know which movies are bad or good. This movie is a MUST-SEE!!! I acclaim Keaton especially for her wonderful work in this movie. 'The Good Mother' is proof that Keaton is one of the world's most rare and special actresses. If you're not suffering from brain deterioration, immediately rent this movie! You won't regret it.

tenderness
I saw this movie 2 years ago on TV and I was deeply moved by it. I'm looking everywhere to find this movie on video but I haven't found it yet. I also read the book, before I saw the film and I think it's the first time that I like more the film than the book of a same story. I must confess that since this film I became a fan of Liam Neeson. It's a film that sensitive people must see. The scene before the mirror has remained with me all along.


The Endurance - Shackleton's Legendary Expedition
Released in VHS Tape by Columbia Tristar Hom (02 September, 2003)
MPAA Rating: G (General Audience)
Director: George Butler (II)
Starring: Liam Neeson
Several films have documented or dramatized the incredible saga of Ernest Shackleton's ill-fated trans-Antarctic expedition, but The Endurance offers the most comprehensive one-source reference. Originally presented as a PBS Nova special and narrated by Liam Neeson, this excellent film--based on Caroline Alexander's acclaimed book, also titled after the ironic name of Shackleton's doomed ship--chronicles the astonishing events of 1914-16, when Shackleton and 27 crewmen survived against all odds after their ship was crushed in the polar ice floes. This is the only "Shackleton" film to incorporate new footage, expert interviews, dramatic recreations (without dialogue), and expedition photographer Frank Hurley's archival film and photographs. The cumulative effect of this extensive material gives the viewer an almost palpable sense of the expedition's hardship and unlikely survival, made possible in part by a man who had precisely the required experience and leadership skills, and in part by what can only be described as divine intervention. No matter how you interpret it, this is rightly called "the greatest survival story ever told." --Jeff Shannon
Average review score:

Shackleton's Endurance
Ernest Shackleton was an adventurer and leader heart. After a failed expedition to be the first to reach the South Pole, his next attempt would be to cross Antarctica passing through the Pole. He'd be the first to do that. Unfortunately, with the world on the brink of war, people thought him more foolish then heroic. Still he proceeded with over twenty seafaring men. In a short amount of time, his ship THE ENDURANCE was 'captured' by ice flows. With no hope for rescue, the battered crew journeys out on an unforgettable quest to save themselves. The year and a half long adventure is an extremely motivational story showing what can be done with the passion to overcome obstacles.

This documentary is based on the book of the same name and uses some actual silent footage from the expedition. It includes interviews with family members of the adventurers all held together by a smart narration by Liam Neeson. But, inherent in Shackleton's expedition lies the film's major flaw. To create the greatest opportunity for survival, the camera is left behind early in the expedition. This leaves almost half the film playing like a book-on-tape with modern footage of penguins, icebergs and seals playing on-screen to keep you occupied. Quite often the visuals have absolutely no connection with the narration. The filmmaker could have considered minor re-creations, visual maps or even computer graphics to keep the film varied and interesting.

The story in itself is very encouraging even if the problems were all brought about by foolish pride. You might want to consider reading one of the many books based on the subject if this film is unavailable in your area.

INTENSE, GRIPPING, INCREDIBLE
THE ENDURANCE (Columbia Tristar) brings to vivid life Ernest Shackleton's nightmarish Antarctic expedition (1914-1916). Expedition photographer Frank Hurley's startling movie and still pictures, shot under the most extreme, unfavorable conditions, show Shackleton's ship, the ironically named Endurance, trapped in a blizzard and then jammed in an expanding ice pack. The vice grip of the ice relentlessly squeezes the Endurance until it cracks like a walnut and the 27 crewmen move onto the ice with salvaged items. And then the real terror begins. It was truly Providential that all the men lived to tell this fantastic survival story. This is a truly mesmerizing documentary and is highly recommended.

THE GREATEST SURVIVAL STORY EVER TOLD...
This is an exemplary documentary, based upon author Caroline Alexander's critically acclaimed, best selling book of the doomed 1914 Antarctic expedition led by Sir Edward Shackleton. Effectively narrated by Liam Neeson, the film tells the story of this star-crossed expedition which set sail upon the ironically named ship, "The Endurance". Shackleton and his crew set out to attempt the first expedition across the vast, still uncharted, icy regions of the Antarctic continent.

Unfortunately, the ship became locked in an icy vise created by polar floes not long after it set sail, which eventually encased and crushed the ship it held in its grasp. This forced the crew out on the ice to survive an adventure that was to last them over a year and a half. Only the courage and determination of Shackleton and his crew enabled them all to survive their harrowing experience, escaping the icy death that was the expected outcome of their dire situation.

Told through the incorporation and use of expedition photographer Frank Hurley's archival silent film footage and stills, which miraculously survived, as well as modern day film and photographs, a rich in situ backdrop is provided for this gripping story of survival. The film is also augmented by interviews with elderly relatives of the survivors. The makers of this documentary also ground the story in the historical context of the day, enriching this story further. All in all, this is an exemplary documentary and one which those who are interested in explorations will enjoy, as will those who enjoy films in which the human spirit triumphs.


La Mision
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (21 February, 1995)
MPAA Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Director: Roland Joffé
Starring: Robert De Niro and Jeremy Irons
Roland Joffé (The Killing Fields) directs this fuzzy effort at a David Lean-like epic without David Lean's sense of emotional proportion. Lean's most important screenwriting collaborator, Robert Bolt, in fact wrote The Mission, which concerns a Jesuit missionary (Jeremy Irons) who establishes a church in the hostile jungles of Brazil and then finds his work threatened by greed and political forces among his superiors. Robert De Niro is briefly effective as a callous soldier who kills his own brother and then turns to Irons's character to oversee his penance and conversion to the clergy. The narrative and dramatic forces at work in this movie should be more stirring and powerful than they are--the problem being that Joffé is too removed from them to allow us in. --Tom Keogh
Average review score:

A Truly Breathtaking Movie
The Mission stars Jeremy Irons and Robert DeNiro, but also includes brief performances from Liam Neeson and Aidan Quinn. The movie is set in the jungles of South America during the late 1700s.

Jeremy Irons is a Jesuit priest trying to convert and protect the indigenous people. DeNiro is excellent in his portrayal of a hot-blooded slave-trader who has a change of heart. Together, they will struggle to save the people from takeover by the commercial exploits of the Spanish and Portuguese.

The story moves very well, and the scenery is gorgeous. I believe this film won an Oscar for its cinematography. The musical score is hauntingly beautiful. The message is still powerful today. I would recommend seeing this.

The Mission portrays the mission of Christ
The Mission is a powerful movie with a powerful message about sin, redemption, and love. It probes deep into the evils of the Catholic Church in Spain and Portugal in teh mid 18th century. Robert De Niro brilliantly portrays Rodrigo Mendoza, a dynamic character who transforms his life to a murderer who trades slaves to a Jesuit priest who fights for those seemingly 'enslaved' natives - the Guaranese. Jeremy Irons ixquisitley plays the role of a truly Christ-like figure. Father Gabriel is the epitomy of compassion, lvove, and understanding. With an incredibly written screenplay by Robert Bolt (who also wrote A Man For All Seasons), the Mission is an incredible film which explores the depths and beauty of morality and life ont he path to Jesus Christ.

"The Mission"
"The Mission"
En el video Father Gabriel es un sacerdote. Father Gabriel va a una mision para ayudar a los indigenas. Father Gabriel es un misionero en el mundo y quiere ayudar a la gente y demonstrar la importancia de cristianismo. En el video "The Mission" Father Gabriel va a la sierra de Brasil para ensenar cristianismo a los habitantes. El cree que el cristanismo es muy importante. Durante el video mucha accion se ocurre con la gente y la mision de Father Gabriel.
"The Mission" es un video sumamente importante para todos. Yo pienso que este video forma una opinion sobre la importancia de la vida de otras culturas. Yo creo que el video abre los ojos y la corazon para los derechos humanos. Durante el video yo aprendi mucho sobre yo mismo y sobre mi opinion de las creencias de otras culturas. Yo aprendi sobre que lo que paso en los tiempos de la conquista y colonia. En mi vida mi creencia cultura es muy importante. Es necesario respectar las diferencias entre personas. Que ocurre cuando las personas no tienen derechos? Que ocurria si el mundo no tuviera diferente cios? En mi opinion nosotros vivimos en un mundo en que hay problemas con la comunicacion sobre la vida de los habitantes. Yo creo que es muy importante practicar su religion, su cultura, y para todos tener derechos. Yo se que no puede ser perfecto el mundo pero es muy importante practicar sus creencias en paz. La vida de los indigenas cambio desde los derechos, la libertad y sus culturas
Yo creo que es muy importante mantener la cultura de los indigenas. Yo creo que esta cita de la pelicula es muy importante para el futuro del mundo "The light shines in the darkness and the darkness has not overcome it. John, Chapter 1:5." Yo creo que es muy importante luchar por sus derechos y practicar sus ideas y creencias. La luz representa a la indigenas porque ellos tienen derechos, libertad y vida porque los ninos vieron que se ocurrio y conocer la importancia de su cultura y la vida de las indigenas. La oscuridad representa a los espanoles porque ellos mataron a la poblacion de las indgienas. Esta cita es muy importante para la idea de la vida de los indigenas. Yo creo que esta cita describe la realidad de la gente indigena. Me encanta este cita porque tiene mucha emocion.
Cuando Ud. tengas tiempo "The Mission" es un video importante para ver. Se puede aprender sobre personas de otras culturas y que se ocurrio durante la conquista de las Americas. Me encanta este video. Aprendi sobre el mundo y sobre yo mismo!


Schindler's List
Released in VHS Tape by Universal Studios (12 August, 1994)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Liam Neeson and Ralph Fiennes
Steven Spielberg had a banner year in 1993. He scored one of his biggest commercial hits that summer with the mega-hit Jurassic Park, but it was the artistic and critical triumph of Schindler's List that Spielberg called "the most satisfying experience of my career." Adapted from the best-selling book by Thomas Keneally and filmed in Poland with an emphasis on absolute authenticity, Spielberg's masterpiece ranks among the greatest films ever made about the Holocaust during World War II. It's a film about heroism with an unlikely hero at its center--Catholic war profiteer Oskar Schindler (Liam Neeson), who risked his life and went bankrupt to save more than 1,000 Jews from certain death in concentration camps.

By employing Jews in his crockery factory manufacturing goods for the German army, Schindler ensures their survival against terrifying odds. At the same time, he must remain solvent with the help of a Jewish accountant (Ben Kingsley) and negotiate business with a vicious, obstinate Nazi commandant (Ralph Fiennes) who enjoys shooting Jews as target practice from the balcony of his villa overlooking a prison camp. Schindler's List gains much of its power not by trying to explain Schindler's motivations, but by dramatizing the delicate diplomacy and determination with which he carried out his generous deeds.

As a drinker and womanizer who thought nothing of associating with Nazis, Schindler was hardly a model of decency; the film is largely about his transformation in response to the horror around him. Spielberg doesn't flinch from that horror, and the result is a film that combines remarkable humanity with abhorrent inhumanity--a film that functions as a powerful history lesson and a testament to the resilience of the human spirit in the context of a living nightmare. --Jeff Shannon

Average review score:

Most over-rated film in history
I thought this movie was pretty good, but not certainly the "best" film of all time. The movie tended to be propagandist, cheesy and at times boring. The best film in my opinion on this subject matter is "Europa! Europa!"; which at least is an intriguing and suspenseful movie which is even able to portray some Germans as real people. Probably the best film Spielberg ever made was "Duel". How Spielberg was able to make such a suspenseful movie involving a car and truck chase, must certainly go down in cinematic history as the most incredible low budget improvisation of all time.

The List Is A Life
Any way you stack it, Steven Spielberg's 1993 masterpiece SCHINDLER'S LIST is one of the most important and enlightening films ever made. It is a heartfelt, deeply personal film about one of the ghastliest events in human history--the Holocaust--and how one man, a Nazi profiteer by the name of Oskar Schindler, while motivated by money, managed to save some 1200 Jews from the gas chambers of Auschwitz during World War II.

Spielberg wisely does not gloss over the fact that Schindler was every bit the womanizer as he was an astute, cagey businessman who made deals with the Nazis to set up an enamelware factory in the Cracow ghetto and employ the Jewish populace there. But his very trusted secretary Itzhak Stern (Ben Kingsley) manages to awaken a latent spark of humanity in the once cold-blooded Schindler. By the time the war is over and the facts are known about the Nazi atrocities, Schindler is financially broke but spiritually enriched. "He who saves one life saves the world entire."

Filmed in somber, documentary-like black-and-white by Janusz Kaminski, SCHINDLER'S LIST features superb performances by Neeson and Kingsley, as well as British actor Ralph Fiennes as the extraordinarily chilling Nazi commandant Amon Goeth, whose basic senses of Nazi business Schindler must appeal to while keeping the fact that he is sheltering the Jews a secret. Spielberg spares nothing in showing us the horrors of the Nazis barbarism; and although it is, not surprisingly, a very lengthy film (three hours and ten minutes), a lot happens for us to absorb, so it never becomes ponderous or heavy-handed.

Winner of seven Oscars, including a Best Director nod to Spielberg that was long overdue, SCHINDLER'S LIST shows us the worst in humanity, but also the best as well. Even in so much pain and death, there is hope. And that is why this film is such a masterpiece.

A cinematic masterpiece!
Meet Oskar Schindler. A German living in occupied Poland during World War II. A member in good standing of the Nazi party. A womanizer, a war profiteer...and ultimately a man of conscience. A man who became one of the great unsung heroes and humanitarians of the war.

"Schindler's List" chronicles Oskar Schindler's spiritual odyssey from war profiteer to humanitarian and hero. Winner of seven Academy Awards® in 1993, including Best Picture, this harrowing and heart-rending film is Steven Spielberg's masterpiece, and perhaps one of the finest and most important movies ever made. It depicts Schindler's ultimately successful attempt to rescue 1,100 Jews from Hitler's "Final Solution" by getting them to safety outside Poland.

Dynamic performances abound in this beautiful movie, Especially noteworthy are Liam Neeson as the suave Schindler, Ralph Fiennes as the monstrously depraved Nazi colonel, Amon Goeth, and Ben Kingsley as the dignified, principled Jewish prisoner Itzhak Stern.

"Schindler's List" is definitely not light entertainment! This beautiful movie allows viewers to feel like they're actually a part of one of the darkest, most horrific periods in history. (I'm sure this is the reason the film was shot in black-and-white, with only minor "colorized" bits included.) The story of the Holocaust needs to be told over and over again, in hopes that future generations can understand the horrors perpetrated on an entire race of people and prevent future occurrences. "Schindler's List" is perhaps one of the best and most effective vehicles for telling that story I've ever experienced.


Schindler's List (Widescreen Edition)
Released in VHS Tape by Universal Studios (12 August, 1994)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Liam Neeson and Ralph Fiennes
Steven Spielberg had a banner year in 1993. He scored one of his biggest commercial hits that summer with the mega-hit Jurassic Park, but it was the artistic and critical triumph of Schindler's List that Spielberg called "the most satisfying experience of my career." Adapted from the best-selling book by Thomas Keneally and filmed in Poland with an emphasis on absolute authenticity, Spielberg's masterpiece ranks among the greatest films ever made about the Holocaust during World War II. It's a film about heroism with an unlikely hero at its center--Catholic war profiteer Oskar Schindler (Liam Neeson), who risked his life and went bankrupt to save more than 1,000 Jews from certain death in concentration camps.

By employing Jews in his crockery factory manufacturing goods for the German army, Schindler ensures their survival against terrifying odds. At the same time, he must remain solvent with the help of a Jewish accountant (Ben Kingsley) and negotiate business with a vicious, obstinate Nazi commandant (Ralph Fiennes) who enjoys shooting Jews as target practice from the balcony of his villa overlooking a prison camp. Schindler's List gains much of its power not by trying to explain Schindler's motivations, but by dramatizing the delicate diplomacy and determination with which he carried out his generous deeds.

As a drinker and womanizer who thought nothing of associating with Nazis, Schindler was hardly a model of decency; the film is largely about his transformation in response to the horror around him. Spielberg doesn't flinch from that horror, and the result is a film that combines remarkable humanity with abhorrent inhumanity--a film that functions as a powerful history lesson and a testament to the resilience of the human spirit in the context of a living nightmare. --Jeff Shannon

Average review score:

Most over-rated film in history
I thought this movie was pretty good, but not certainly the "best" film of all time. The movie tended to be propagandist, cheesy and at times boring. The best film in my opinion on this subject matter is "Europa! Europa!"; which at least is an intriguing and suspenseful movie which is even able to portray some Germans as real people. Probably the best film Spielberg ever made was "Duel". How Spielberg was able to make such a suspenseful movie involving a car and truck chase, must certainly go down in cinematic history as the most incredible low budget improvisation of all time.

The List Is A Life
Any way you stack it, Steven Spielberg's 1993 masterpiece SCHINDLER'S LIST is one of the most important and enlightening films ever made. It is a heartfelt, deeply personal film about one of the ghastliest events in human history--the Holocaust--and how one man, a Nazi profiteer by the name of Oskar Schindler, while motivated by money, managed to save some 1200 Jews from the gas chambers of Auschwitz during World War II.

Spielberg wisely does not gloss over the fact that Schindler was every bit the womanizer as he was an astute, cagey businessman who made deals with the Nazis to set up an enamelware factory in the Cracow ghetto and employ the Jewish populace there. But his very trusted secretary Itzhak Stern (Ben Kingsley) manages to awaken a latent spark of humanity in the once cold-blooded Schindler. By the time the war is over and the facts are known about the Nazi atrocities, Schindler is financially broke but spiritually enriched. "He who saves one life saves the world entire."

Filmed in somber, documentary-like black-and-white by Janusz Kaminski, SCHINDLER'S LIST features superb performances by Neeson and Kingsley, as well as British actor Ralph Fiennes as the extraordinarily chilling Nazi commandant Amon Goeth, whose basic senses of Nazi business Schindler must appeal to while keeping the fact that he is sheltering the Jews a secret. Spielberg spares nothing in showing us the horrors of the Nazis barbarism; and although it is, not surprisingly, a very lengthy film (three hours and ten minutes), a lot happens for us to absorb, so it never becomes ponderous or heavy-handed.

Winner of seven Oscars, including a Best Director nod to Spielberg that was long overdue, SCHINDLER'S LIST shows us the worst in humanity, but also the best as well. Even in so much pain and death, there is hope. And that is why this film is such a masterpiece.

A cinematic masterpiece!
Meet Oskar Schindler. A German living in occupied Poland during World War II. A member in good standing of the Nazi party. A womanizer, a war profiteer...and ultimately a man of conscience. A man who became one of the great unsung heroes and humanitarians of the war.

"Schindler's List" chronicles Oskar Schindler's spiritual odyssey from war profiteer to humanitarian and hero. Winner of seven Academy Awards® in 1993, including Best Picture, this harrowing and heart-rending film is Steven Spielberg's masterpiece, and perhaps one of the finest and most important movies ever made. It depicts Schindler's ultimately successful attempt to rescue 1,100 Jews from Hitler's "Final Solution" by getting them to safety outside Poland.

Dynamic performances abound in this beautiful movie, Especially noteworthy are Liam Neeson as the suave Schindler, Ralph Fiennes as the monstrously depraved Nazi colonel, Amon Goeth, and Ben Kingsley as the dignified, principled Jewish prisoner Itzhak Stern.

"Schindler's List" is definitely not light entertainment! This beautiful movie allows viewers to feel like they're actually a part of one of the darkest, most horrific periods in history. (I'm sure this is the reason the film was shot in black-and-white, with only minor "colorized" bits included.) The story of the Holocaust needs to be told over and over again, in hopes that future generations can understand the horrors perpetrated on an entire race of people and prevent future occurrences. "Schindler's List" is perhaps one of the best and most effective vehicles for telling that story I've ever experienced.


Schindler's List - Limited Edition Gift Set
Released in VHS Tape by Umvd (29 August, 1995)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Liam Neeson and Ralph Fiennes
Steven Spielberg had a banner year in 1993. He scored one of his biggest commercial hits that summer with the mega-hit Jurassic Park, but it was the artistic and critical triumph of Schindler's List that Spielberg called "the most satisfying experience of my career." Adapted from the best-selling book by Thomas Keneally and filmed in Poland with an emphasis on absolute authenticity, Spielberg's masterpiece ranks among the greatest films ever made about the Holocaust during World War II. It's a film about heroism with an unlikely hero at its center--Catholic war profiteer Oskar Schindler (Liam Neeson), who risked his life and went bankrupt to save more than 1,000 Jews from certain death in concentration camps.

By employing Jews in his crockery factory manufacturing goods for the German army, Schindler ensures their survival against terrifying odds. At the same time, he must remain solvent with the help of a Jewish accountant (Ben Kingsley) and negotiate business with a vicious, obstinate Nazi commandant (Ralph Fiennes) who enjoys shooting Jews as target practice from the balcony of his villa overlooking a prison camp. Schindler's List gains much of its power not by trying to explain Schindler's motivations, but by dramatizing the delicate diplomacy and determination with which he carried out his generous deeds.

As a drinker and womanizer who thought nothing of associating with Nazis, Schindler was hardly a model of decency; the film is largely about his transformation in response to the horror around him. Spielberg doesn't flinch from that horror, and the result is a film that combines remarkable humanity with abhorrent inhumanity--a film that functions as a powerful history lesson and a testament to the resilience of the human spirit in the context of a living nightmare. --Jeff Shannon

Average review score:

Most over-rated film in history
I thought this movie was pretty good, but not certainly the "best" film of all time. The movie tended to be propagandist, cheesy and at times boring. The best film in my opinion on this subject matter is "Europa! Europa!"; which at least is an intriguing and suspenseful movie which is even able to portray some Germans as real people. Probably the best film Spielberg ever made was "Duel". How Spielberg was able to make such a suspenseful movie involving a car and truck chase, must certainly go down in cinematic history as the most incredible low budget improvisation of all time.

The List Is A Life
Any way you stack it, Steven Spielberg's 1993 masterpiece SCHINDLER'S LIST is one of the most important and enlightening films ever made. It is a heartfelt, deeply personal film about one of the ghastliest events in human history--the Holocaust--and how one man, a Nazi profiteer by the name of Oskar Schindler, while motivated by money, managed to save some 1200 Jews from the gas chambers of Auschwitz during World War II.

Spielberg wisely does not gloss over the fact that Schindler was every bit the womanizer as he was an astute, cagey businessman who made deals with the Nazis to set up an enamelware factory in the Cracow ghetto and employ the Jewish populace there. But his very trusted secretary Itzhak Stern (Ben Kingsley) manages to awaken a latent spark of humanity in the once cold-blooded Schindler. By the time the war is over and the facts are known about the Nazi atrocities, Schindler is financially broke but spiritually enriched. "He who saves one life saves the world entire."

Filmed in somber, documentary-like black-and-white by Janusz Kaminski, SCHINDLER'S LIST features superb performances by Neeson and Kingsley, as well as British actor Ralph Fiennes as the extraordinarily chilling Nazi commandant Amon Goeth, whose basic senses of Nazi business Schindler must appeal to while keeping the fact that he is sheltering the Jews a secret. Spielberg spares nothing in showing us the horrors of the Nazis barbarism; and although it is, not surprisingly, a very lengthy film (three hours and ten minutes), a lot happens for us to absorb, so it never becomes ponderous or heavy-handed.

Winner of seven Oscars, including a Best Director nod to Spielberg that was long overdue, SCHINDLER'S LIST shows us the worst in humanity, but also the best as well. Even in so much pain and death, there is hope. And that is why this film is such a masterpiece.

A cinematic masterpiece!
Meet Oskar Schindler. A German living in occupied Poland during World War II. A member in good standing of the Nazi party. A womanizer, a war profiteer...and ultimately a man of conscience. A man who became one of the great unsung heroes and humanitarians of the war.

"Schindler's List" chronicles Oskar Schindler's spiritual odyssey from war profiteer to humanitarian and hero. Winner of seven Academy Awards® in 1993, including Best Picture, this harrowing and heart-rending film is Steven Spielberg's masterpiece, and perhaps one of the finest and most important movies ever made. It depicts Schindler's ultimately successful attempt to rescue 1,100 Jews from Hitler's "Final Solution" by getting them to safety outside Poland.

Dynamic performances abound in this beautiful movie, Especially noteworthy are Liam Neeson as the suave Schindler, Ralph Fiennes as the monstrously depraved Nazi colonel, Amon Goeth, and Ben Kingsley as the dignified, principled Jewish prisoner Itzhak Stern.

"Schindler's List" is definitely not light entertainment! This beautiful movie allows viewers to feel like they're actually a part of one of the darkest, most horrific periods in history. (I'm sure this is the reason the film was shot in black-and-white, with only minor "colorized" bits included.) The story of the Holocaust needs to be told over and over again, in hopes that future generations can understand the horrors perpetrated on an entire race of people and prevent future occurrences. "Schindler's List" is perhaps one of the best and most effective vehicles for telling that story I've ever experienced.


Excalibur
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (11 August, 1982)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: John Boorman
Starring: Nigel Terry and Helen Mirren
This lush retelling of the legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table is a dark and engrossing tale. Director John Boorman (Deliverance) masterfully handles the tale of the mythical sword Excalibur, and its passing from the wizard Merlin to the future king of England. Arthur pulls the famed sword from a stone and is destined to be crowned king. As the king embarks on a passionate love affair with Guenevere, an illegitimate son, and Merlin's designs on power, threaten Arthur's reign. The film is visually stunning and unflinching in its scenes of combat and black magic. Featuring an impressive supporting cast, including early work from the likes of Liam Neeson and Gabriel Byrne, Excalibur is an adaptation of the legend both faithful and bold. --Robert Lane
Average review score:

Not Perfect, But Darn Close...
It's tough to compress the 900-some-odd pages of text that Thomas Malory used to tell his story of Le Morte d'Arthur into 140 minutes, but director John Boorman and screenwriter Rospo Pallenberg give it a good shot. While it sometimes leaves out important details or compresses events in the interest of time, it can never be accused of playing fast and loose with the legend. However, the film also requires a bit of work on the part of the viewer to fill in some of the details, and it's obvious Boorman expects his viewer to be at least passing familiar with the traditions of the Arthurian legend (anyone unfamiliar with the mythology associated with Avalon, for example, may be baffled by the imagery in the film's closing moments).

With its darkened, cloud-streaked skies, lonely stone castles, eerie green lighting, (all caught in beautiful widescreen glory on the DVD!) and use of the music of Richard Wagner, you won't find a moodier, more beautifully shot film. In fact, there are some downright breathtaking cinematic moments in this film -- from the wedding of Arthur and Guinevere (complete with medieval chants and armor polished to a mirror-like sheen) to the Lady of the Lake's clean catch of Excalibur over the swooshing music of Wagner. Great stuff.

While Nicol Williamson turns in a very game performance as Merlin, it's Nigel Terry who carries the film in an underappreciated but wholly believeable interpretation of King Arthur. Terry leaves the scenery-chewing to Williamson, and anchors the film instead with a steady, understated performance. Look also for stars-in-the-making Liam Neeson as the jealous Gawain, and Patrick Stewart as Guenevere's father, Leodegrance.

EXCALIBUR has all the elements one expects in a fantasy; yet, in a sense, Boorman does for the sword-and-sorcery film what Sergio Leone did for the western: whereas prior horse operas showed cowboys riding across the desert and shuffing down dirt streets without a bit of sweat, and firing pistols that never drew blood, Leone made everyone look hot and sweaty, and showed that a Smith & Wesson could rip a real hole through your gut. Boorman does the same for the knight in this film -- knights clunk around clumsily in heavy armor, get skewered on pikes, get their heads bashed in, and cough their guts out in bloody mud puddles. It all lends an air of veracity to the film that makes it all seem like It Could Really Have Happened This Way.

The widescreen format available on DVD gives this film the weight and heft it has long deserved, and there are some real gems lurking among the additional features -- a surprisingly cheezy, Grade B trailer, and a really great alternate soundtrack in which director John Boorman discusses the action and shares some behind-the-scene goodies (such as the fact that Nicol Williamson and Helen Mirren couldn't stand each other, or that the actor playing the teenaged Mordred was actually a first-rate horseman).

Fantastic
I am not an Arthurian legend stickler and I have no qualms about the details of the film. 'Excalibur' is pure entertainment. It is an epic: the acting, plot, scenery, musical score and moral themes blend together seamlessly. Simply a thoroughly and completely fantastic movie; indeed in the genre of fantasy I have seen no equal (that includes the LoTR). This Wagnerian masterpiece is definitely one for the collection.

SPELLBOUND
OH, yes indeeed - this is one for all ages, beautifully cast, costumed, photographed, etc. etc. etc.

FASCINATING TO WATCH after two decades is it? [and we make such a fuss over the current "Ring Cycle"] This one's also pre-CGI - and such splendor.

New faces of that time include Gabriel Byrne and Liam Neeson - but it's the brilliance of Nicol Williamson and Merlin and Helen Mirren as Morgana that impress and continue to impress.

A rare treat for myth lovers!

[Great 'repeat' shots - the Lady of the Lake vs Mr. Boorman's shotgun holding hand in 'Deliverance' and for more fun there's always ZARDOZ!]


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