Michelle-Pfeiffer Movie Reviews


Related Subjects: Michael-J.-Fox
More Pages: Michelle-Pfeiffer Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
VHS movie reviews for "Michelle-Pfeiffer" sorted by average review score:

Dangerous Minds
Released in VHS Tape by Hollywood Pictures (13 August, 2002)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: John N. Smith
Starring: Michelle Pfeiffer and George Dzundza
This "To Ma'am with Love" is much more an escapist popcorn movie than the inner-city document its marketing suggested. Michelle Pfeiffer plays real-life former Marine Louanne Johnson, a high school English teacher who meets resistance from kids and administration alike at a tough urban school in Northern California. Pfeiffer is good, and her character's overall development even survives various post-production story cuts. (A romance with Andy Garcia's character was completely eliminated before release; Garcia is nowhere in sight.) The actors who play Johnson's students are also fine, and the whole film becomes the latest in a long tradition of sentimental movies about teachers who change the lives of kids. --Tom Keogh
Average review score:

An excellent real life movie you can't miss
After I watched Dangerous Minds for the first time I couldn't stop watching it. It was such a good movie. It was sad but that was part of what made it so good. Sometimes in order to enjoy a movie there has to be sad parts or it doesn't seem realistic.

My favortie character in the movie was Callie Roberts. She was such a smart, strong person. I felt sorry for her having to be in a class like that.

If you haven't seen Dangerous Minds, you have to rent it. You won't regret it.

The greatest high school student movie ever made!
Nowadays, high school movies are just crude and gross humor filled (i.e. The New Guy which wasn't a bad movie at all), but in 1995, a little movie called "Dangerous Minds" came out. This was a very beautiful movie. I loved every second of it. The storyline was very good. Michelle Pfeiffer (Pre- I Am Sam and Up Close and Personal) stars as an ex-Marine who is interested in being a substitute teacher to a SMART kid class. But she is placed as the sub teacher of a bunch of urban-ghetto students. The students at first don't like her, but they grow on her as they do on her. The storyline is similar to "Stand and Deliver" but don't consider this as a sequel or an imitation. This movie is awesome! I will love this movie forever. This movie also has a great hiphop/r&b/rap soundtrack that was a hit in 95. There were some good movies that came out in 95, but this was the very best. I don't know why this movie did not get an Oscar nomination! The only objectionable content in this movie is the language which there is a little bit of but not vulgar or pervasive as some movies are today. The MPAA rated this R for language. Get this movie instantly on DVD. This is a must see for all junior high and high school students. Some elementary school students might be interested in this movie but I'm sure it won't be a must see for them. I highly recommend this movie to all ages unless you don't want your young kids (mostly 9 and below) to hear the profanity, then don't let them, but this is the best drama I have ever viewed. If you are looking for a more suitable movie for your young kids instead of "DM" then get the also a must see "Stand and Deliver" which is rated PG for some mild language!

Flawless film. Pfieffer's finest hour
This is quite simply an amazing film. There is none better in this theme. Pfieffer really delivers as do her costars. Geniune, honest, real, gritty, bears it teeth and gives us a bite. Prepare yourself to be invested and care about these students.


Tequila Sunrise
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (19 January, 1994)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Robert Towne
Starring: Mel Gibson, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Kurt Russell
Robert Towne is one of Hollywood's most celebrated screenwriters, but because his directorial efforts have been few and far between, anticipation was high when this star-powered crime story was released in 1988. Critical reaction was decidedly mixed, but there's plenty to admire in this silky, visually seductive film about a drug dealer (Mel Gibson) whose best friend from high-school (Kurt Russell) is now working for the Los Angeles sheriff's drug detail. Their personal and professional conflicts are intensified by their love for the same woman, a waitress (Michelle Pfeiffer) at the Italian restaurant they both frequent. There's a big deal going down with a drug lord (the late Raul Julia), but as it twists and turns, Towne's story is really more about personal loyalties and individual honor. And even if it doesn't quite hold together, the movie's got a fantastic look to it (courtesy of the great cinematographer Conrad Hall), and the three stars bring depth and dimension to their well-written roles. --Jeff Shannon
Average review score:

Big boost for hot tub sales, I'd reckon.
This slick, modern neo-noir from "Chinatown" screenwriter Robert Towne makes up for its shortcomings with a charismatic cast. Using the well-worn "noir love triangle" formula, "Tequila Sunrise" is sort of a modern take on "Out Of The Past" or "Strange Love Of Martha Ivers". Kurt Russell and Mel Gibson are convincing as old pals who end up on opposite sides of the law, and Michelle Pfeiffer is a perfect choice for a "love interest" (duh!). One sticking point...Gibson as a coke dealer. He just doesn't seem "oily" enough. It is Russell who actually exudes the properly shady "noirish" vibe, even though he's the "law". On the plus side, this IS Robert Towne, so there is some very well written, mature dialogue for the actors to chew on. However, some unexplained jumps in the narrative raises speculation about a "director's cut" someday. Excellent support from J.T. Walsh and particularly from Raul Julia, who absolutely nails his character, projecting more depth in much less screen time than fellow cast members. By the way, the much discussed "hot tub" sequence screams "body doubles!" to this viewer--watch it closely (like you need encouragement!)

A master piece among crime movies
Tequila Sunrise is an excellent crime/action movie. It has suffered a bit from bad press, which in my opinion is totally unjustified. People have said, that the actors were wasted on this kind of movie. This is nonsense! Tequila Sunrise is one of the best movies in its genre BECAUSE it was made with good, instead of the usual mediocre actors. It shows clearly, that with good acting and a somewhat complecated script a rather unasuming movie can rise to unexpacted heights. Mel Gibson and Kurt Russel are particularly well suited to their respective roles as sympathetic ex-crook and not so sympathetic police officer. Michelle Pfeiffer in a somewhat unusual role as the woman in between these two lends a depth to the part which females in this kind of story usually lack. Finally Raul Julia as a mexican dope smuggler is a very enjoyable sight. You can never really hate him even when he starts issuing execution orders. A pleausre to watch.

Fantastic Movie
If you looking for a movie with talented actors at acting this is the movie you got to see. If you want to watch a movie with some comody mixed with crime and action with a touch of romance this is the one for you. I am not a huge fan of action movies that always have to have love in the air but this movie isn't bad with the plot it has that the action and romance fall into. If I and other reviewers give this movie five stars you should believe and say so yourself.


Tequila Sunrise
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (13 January, 1998)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Robert Towne
Starring: Mel Gibson, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Kurt Russell
Robert Towne is one of Hollywood's most celebrated screenwriters, but because his directorial efforts have been few and far between, anticipation was high when this star-powered crime story was released in 1988. Critical reaction was decidedly mixed, but there's plenty to admire in this silky, visually seductive film about a drug dealer (Mel Gibson) whose best friend from high-school (Kurt Russell) is now working for the Los Angeles sheriff's drug detail. Their personal and professional conflicts are intensified by their love for the same woman, a waitress (Michelle Pfeiffer) at the Italian restaurant they both frequent. There's a big deal going down with a drug lord (the late Raul Julia), but as it twists and turns, Towne's story is really more about personal loyalties and individual honor. And even if it doesn't quite hold together, the movie's got a fantastic look to it (courtesy of the great cinematographer Conrad Hall), and the three stars bring depth and dimension to their well-written roles. --Jeff Shannon
Average review score:

Big boost for hot tub sales, I'd reckon.
This slick, modern neo-noir from "Chinatown" screenwriter Robert Towne makes up for its shortcomings with a charismatic cast. Using the well-worn "noir love triangle" formula, "Tequila Sunrise" is sort of a modern take on "Out Of The Past" or "Strange Love Of Martha Ivers". Kurt Russell and Mel Gibson are convincing as old pals who end up on opposite sides of the law, and Michelle Pfeiffer is a perfect choice for a "love interest" (duh!). One sticking point...Gibson as a coke dealer. He just doesn't seem "oily" enough. It is Russell who actually exudes the properly shady "noirish" vibe, even though he's the "law". On the plus side, this IS Robert Towne, so there is some very well written, mature dialogue for the actors to chew on. However, some unexplained jumps in the narrative raises speculation about a "director's cut" someday. Excellent support from J.T. Walsh and particularly from Raul Julia, who absolutely nails his character, projecting more depth in much less screen time than fellow cast members. By the way, the much discussed "hot tub" sequence screams "body doubles!" to this viewer--watch it closely (like you need encouragement!)

A master piece among crime movies
Tequila Sunrise is an excellent crime/action movie. It has suffered a bit from bad press, which in my opinion is totally unjustified. People have said, that the actors were wasted on this kind of movie. This is nonsense! Tequila Sunrise is one of the best movies in its genre BECAUSE it was made with good, instead of the usual mediocre actors. It shows clearly, that with good acting and a somewhat complecated script a rather unasuming movie can rise to unexpacted heights. Mel Gibson and Kurt Russel are particularly well suited to their respective roles as sympathetic ex-crook and not so sympathetic police officer. Michelle Pfeiffer in a somewhat unusual role as the woman in between these two lends a depth to the part which females in this kind of story usually lack. Finally Raul Julia as a mexican dope smuggler is a very enjoyable sight. You can never really hate him even when he starts issuing execution orders. A pleausre to watch.

Fantastic Movie
If you looking for a movie with talented actors at acting this is the movie you got to see. If you want to watch a movie with some comody mixed with crime and action with a touch of romance this is the one for you. I am not a huge fan of action movies that always have to have love in the air but this movie isn't bad with the plot it has that the action and romance fall into. If I and other reviewers give this movie five stars you should believe and say so yourself.


Tequila Sunrise
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (13 January, 1998)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Robert Towne
Starring: Mel Gibson, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Kurt Russell
Robert Towne is one of Hollywood's most celebrated screenwriters, but because his directorial efforts have been few and far between, anticipation was high when this star-powered crime story was released in 1988. Critical reaction was decidedly mixed, but there's plenty to admire in this silky, visually seductive film about a drug dealer (Mel Gibson) whose best friend from high-school (Kurt Russell) is now working for the Los Angeles sheriff's drug detail. Their personal and professional conflicts are intensified by their love for the same woman, a waitress (Michelle Pfeiffer) at the Italian restaurant they both frequent. There's a big deal going down with a drug lord (the late Raul Julia), but as it twists and turns, Towne's story is really more about personal loyalties and individual honor. And even if it doesn't quite hold together, the movie's got a fantastic look to it (courtesy of the great cinematographer Conrad Hall), and the three stars bring depth and dimension to their well-written roles. --Jeff Shannon
Average review score:

Big boost for hot tub sales, I'd reckon.
This slick, modern neo-noir from "Chinatown" screenwriter Robert Towne makes up for its shortcomings with a charismatic cast. Using the well-worn "noir love triangle" formula, "Tequila Sunrise" is sort of a modern take on "Out Of The Past" or "Strange Love Of Martha Ivers". Kurt Russell and Mel Gibson are convincing as old pals who end up on opposite sides of the law, and Michelle Pfeiffer is a perfect choice for a "love interest" (duh!). One sticking point...Gibson as a coke dealer. He just doesn't seem "oily" enough. It is Russell who actually exudes the properly shady "noirish" vibe, even though he's the "law". On the plus side, this IS Robert Towne, so there is some very well written, mature dialogue for the actors to chew on. However, some unexplained jumps in the narrative raises speculation about a "director's cut" someday. Excellent support from J.T. Walsh and particularly from Raul Julia, who absolutely nails his character, projecting more depth in much less screen time than fellow cast members. By the way, the much discussed "hot tub" sequence screams "body doubles!" to this viewer--watch it closely (like you need encouragement!)

A master piece among crime movies
Tequila Sunrise is an excellent crime/action movie. It has suffered a bit from bad press, which in my opinion is totally unjustified. People have said, that the actors were wasted on this kind of movie. This is nonsense! Tequila Sunrise is one of the best movies in its genre BECAUSE it was made with good, instead of the usual mediocre actors. It shows clearly, that with good acting and a somewhat complecated script a rather unasuming movie can rise to unexpacted heights. Mel Gibson and Kurt Russel are particularly well suited to their respective roles as sympathetic ex-crook and not so sympathetic police officer. Michelle Pfeiffer in a somewhat unusual role as the woman in between these two lends a depth to the part which females in this kind of story usually lack. Finally Raul Julia as a mexican dope smuggler is a very enjoyable sight. You can never really hate him even when he starts issuing execution orders. A pleausre to watch.

Fantastic Movie
If you looking for a movie with talented actors at acting this is the movie you got to see. If you want to watch a movie with some comody mixed with crime and action with a touch of romance this is the one for you. I am not a huge fan of action movies that always have to have love in the air but this movie isn't bad with the plot it has that the action and romance fall into. If I and other reviewers give this movie five stars you should believe and say so yourself.


The Witches of Eastwick
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (28 April, 1998)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: George Miller (II)
Starring: Jack Nicholson, Cher, Susan Sarandon, and Michelle Pfeiffer
Jack Nicholson was born to play the devil, and in George Miller's adaptation of John Updike's novel he plays it for all he's worth. As a wolfish womanizer summoned by three bored women in a picturesque New England town, he's sating all of his appetites with a rakish grin. Cher, Susan Sarandon, and Michelle Pfeiffer play the women who discover their untapped magical powers by accident. The smart and sexy singles, out of place in the conservatism of their village, find happiness, however briefly, in the arms and bed of the libidinous devil, but he's got his own ulterior motives. Miller revels in the sensual display of sex, food, and magic, whipping up a storm of effects that finally get out of hand in an overblown ending. It's a handsome film with strong performances all around, but the mix of anarchic comedy and supernatural horror doesn't always gel and Miller seems to lose the plot in his zeal for cinematic excitement. The performances ultimately keep the film aloft: the hedonistic joy that Nicholson celebrates with every leering gaze and boorish vulgarity is almost enough to make bad form and chauvinism cool. --Sean Axmaker
Average review score:

If the devil had a body, he WOULD be Jack
This is a deliciously wicked fun film! Great premise, awesome characters, terrific performances, fun plot! What's not to like??? This is a film you'll enjoy watching again and again.

For a "horror movie", this one's pretty funny!
To begin with, the title of this movie might actually be considered a misnomer since Susan Sarandon, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Cher don't play true witches; they're just three ordinary-acting girlfriends who happen to have psychic powers through some unexplained twist of Hollywood magic.

Once they conjure up their ideal man in the form of Jack Nicholson, all three women are taken in by his uncanny abilities to bring out their wild sides. Who can forget, for example, the "cello lesson" he gives Jane (Sarandon); or the way he "sweet-talks" Cher into staying when she wants to leave?

Whoever did the special effects for this movie did a darn good job; they're what I enjoy the most about this movie. One of the most beautiful (and funny) effects would be the part when Nicholson makes all three women float above the indoor pool...before his concentration is broken by the entrance of Fidel (Carel Struckyen)....and they all fall in.

And when our heroines discover that the source of Nicholson's power is actually voodoo....! You fill in the blank.

(Carel Struckyen would later go on to play a recurring role on "Star Trek: The Next Generation" as another mute character, Mr. Homn: the personal aide to Lwaxana Troi (Majel Barrett)).

Very good film
This is a good film about 3 lovely, lonely and bored witches, (Cher, Susan Sarandon, Michelle Pfeiffer) who engage in a battle of wits with the devil himself (Jack Nicholson). This is a good film with snappy dialogue and beautiful New England scenery. Some may say the ending is a bit overdone and outrageous, but somehow it fits in with the film, after all it is an offbeat film, offbeat but fun! Also starring in this movie is Veronica Cartwright (Alien, The Birds).


The Witches of Eastwick
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (28 April, 1998)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: George Miller (II)
Starring: Jack Nicholson, Cher, Susan Sarandon, and Michelle Pfeiffer
Jack Nicholson was born to play the devil, and in George Miller's adaptation of John Updike's novel he plays it for all he's worth. As a wolfish womanizer summoned by three bored women in a picturesque New England town, he's sating all of his appetites with a rakish grin. Cher, Susan Sarandon, and Michelle Pfeiffer play the women who discover their untapped magical powers by accident. The smart and sexy singles, out of place in the conservatism of their village, find happiness, however briefly, in the arms and bed of the libidinous devil, but he's got his own ulterior motives. Miller revels in the sensual display of sex, food, and magic, whipping up a storm of effects that finally get out of hand in an overblown ending. It's a handsome film with strong performances all around, but the mix of anarchic comedy and supernatural horror doesn't always gel and Miller seems to lose the plot in his zeal for cinematic excitement. The performances ultimately keep the film aloft: the hedonistic joy that Nicholson celebrates with every leering gaze and boorish vulgarity is almost enough to make bad form and chauvinism cool. --Sean Axmaker
Average review score:

If the devil had a body, he WOULD be Jack
This is a deliciously wicked fun film! Great premise, awesome characters, terrific performances, fun plot! What's not to like??? This is a film you'll enjoy watching again and again.

For a "horror movie", this one's pretty funny!
To begin with, the title of this movie might actually be considered a misnomer since Susan Sarandon, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Cher don't play true witches; they're just three ordinary-acting girlfriends who happen to have psychic powers through some unexplained twist of Hollywood magic.

Once they conjure up their ideal man in the form of Jack Nicholson, all three women are taken in by his uncanny abilities to bring out their wild sides. Who can forget, for example, the "cello lesson" he gives Jane (Sarandon); or the way he "sweet-talks" Cher into staying when she wants to leave?

Whoever did the special effects for this movie did a darn good job; they're what I enjoy the most about this movie. One of the most beautiful (and funny) effects would be the part when Nicholson makes all three women float above the indoor pool...before his concentration is broken by the entrance of Fidel (Carel Struckyen)....and they all fall in.

And when our heroines discover that the source of Nicholson's power is actually voodoo....! You fill in the blank.

(Carel Struckyen would later go on to play a recurring role on "Star Trek: The Next Generation" as another mute character, Mr. Homn: the personal aide to Lwaxana Troi (Majel Barrett)).

Very good film
This is a good film about 3 lovely, lonely and bored witches, (Cher, Susan Sarandon, Michelle Pfeiffer) who engage in a battle of wits with the devil himself (Jack Nicholson). This is a good film with snappy dialogue and beautiful New England scenery. Some may say the ending is a bit overdone and outrageous, but somehow it fits in with the film, after all it is an offbeat film, offbeat but fun! Also starring in this movie is Veronica Cartwright (Alien, The Birds).


The Witches of Eastwick
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Studios (29 September, 1993)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: George Miller (II)
Starring: Jack Nicholson, Cher, Susan Sarandon, and Michelle Pfeiffer
Jack Nicholson was born to play the devil, and in George Miller's adaptation of John Updike's novel he plays it for all he's worth. As a wolfish womanizer summoned by three bored women in a picturesque New England town, he's sating all of his appetites with a rakish grin. Cher, Susan Sarandon, and Michelle Pfeiffer play the women who discover their untapped magical powers by accident. The smart and sexy singles, out of place in the conservatism of their village, find happiness, however briefly, in the arms and bed of the libidinous devil, but he's got his own ulterior motives. Miller revels in the sensual display of sex, food, and magic, whipping up a storm of effects that finally get out of hand in an overblown ending. It's a handsome film with strong performances all around, but the mix of anarchic comedy and supernatural horror doesn't always gel and Miller seems to lose the plot in his zeal for cinematic excitement. The performances ultimately keep the film aloft: the hedonistic joy that Nicholson celebrates with every leering gaze and boorish vulgarity is almost enough to make bad form and chauvinism cool. --Sean Axmaker
Average review score:

If the devil had a body, he WOULD be Jack
This is a deliciously wicked fun film! Great premise, awesome characters, terrific performances, fun plot! What's not to like??? This is a film you'll enjoy watching again and again.

For a "horror movie", this one's pretty funny!
To begin with, the title of this movie might actually be considered a misnomer since Susan Sarandon, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Cher don't play true witches; they're just three ordinary-acting girlfriends who happen to have psychic powers through some unexplained twist of Hollywood magic.

Once they conjure up their ideal man in the form of Jack Nicholson, all three women are taken in by his uncanny abilities to bring out their wild sides. Who can forget, for example, the "cello lesson" he gives Jane (Sarandon); or the way he "sweet-talks" Cher into staying when she wants to leave?

Whoever did the special effects for this movie did a darn good job; they're what I enjoy the most about this movie. One of the most beautiful (and funny) effects would be the part when Nicholson makes all three women float above the indoor pool...before his concentration is broken by the entrance of Fidel (Carel Struckyen)....and they all fall in.

And when our heroines discover that the source of Nicholson's power is actually voodoo....! You fill in the blank.

(Carel Struckyen would later go on to play a recurring role on "Star Trek: The Next Generation" as another mute character, Mr. Homn: the personal aide to Lwaxana Troi (Majel Barrett)).

Very good film
This is a good film about 3 lovely, lonely and bored witches, (Cher, Susan Sarandon, Michelle Pfeiffer) who engage in a battle of wits with the devil himself (Jack Nicholson). This is a good film with snappy dialogue and beautiful New England scenery. Some may say the ending is a bit overdone and outrageous, but somehow it fits in with the film, after all it is an offbeat film, offbeat but fun! Also starring in this movie is Veronica Cartwright (Alien, The Birds).


Wolf
Released in VHS Tape by Columbia/Tristar Studios (09 January, 1995)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Mike Nichols
Starring: Jack Nicholson and Michelle Pfeiffer
Sophisticated to a point, this well-executed wolf-man tale works due to its clever setting and enormous star power. We all know Jack Nicholson can go nuts, but the script makes his character aware of his changes, sometimes for the better, early on. The setting, a publishing house in the middle of a takeover, gives the characters dramatic life before the horror elements kicks in. A senior editor about to get the boot, Nicholson's character becomes a new man after being bitten by a wolf. He takes on challenges at work, lives a more robust life, and attracts a new love. But will his newfound energy consume him? Director Mike Nichols keeps the action alive in the first half, but the film peters out at the end with cheap theatrics and the overuse of slow motion. Michelle Pfeiffer has little to do as simply the love interest with a grittier than average personality. Better is James Spader as a smarmy colleague. Nicholson is in fine form, relying on his keen gift to spark interest (a twitch of the head, a look in the eyes), instead of heavy doses of movie makeup. Giuseppe Rotunno's sweeping camerawork sets the mood quite well. Easy to recommend, with the added feature it's hardly gratuitous. --Doug Thomas
Average review score:

A movie with a modest bite
Will Randall (Jack Nicholson) is the senior editor of a big book company and his life isn't as great as he would like it to be. However, things drastically change, and mostly improve, for Will after he is bitten by a mean looking wolf. Will soon finds out that he is changing more and more every day and that he is becoming like a wolf. Before long, he has better vision, hearing, and a spectacular sense of smell, but not everything has improved for Mr. Randall. Since he is now a lot more like a wolf, animals are now afraid of him and he becomes a murderer, just by following his wolf instincts. Will Mr. Randall find out what he's becoming, and is there a way to stop it?

"Wolf" is a pretty good movie. The makeup and the special effects in the movie aren't some of the best, but they get the job done. Jack Nicholson does a good job of acting and so does Michelle Pfeiffer as Will's new love interest. "Wolf" is a moderately exciting movie, it doesn't have as much blood and gore as you would expect it to have. It also doesn't have as much action as I would've liked to have seen, but it was still an entertaining movie and I recommend anybody who likes horror movies to at least watch "Wolf."

Intelligent horror film/character study
This is an interesting film, because it's partly a character study of a tired, middle aged publisher and partly a horror film about werewolves. Jack Nicholson plays a publisher about to lose his job to his friend and protege, who also happens to be sleeping with his wife. He seems too worn out to put up much of a fight, until he is bitten by a dying wolf, and begins to feel as if he has taken on its spirit. He also falls for the incredibly beautiful daughter of his boss (Michelle Pfeiffer). This movie has top notch acting, an intriuging story and a cool ending. I recommend it.

TOP DRAWER WEREWOLF MOVIE...
This is a thinking person's werewolf movie. Well directed by Mike Nichols, it features a stellar cast who give excellent performances. Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer, Christopher Plummer, James Spader, Kate Nelligan, and David Hyde Pierce all contribute to the successful execution of this sophisticated and subtle horror film. As an added bonus, those of you who are devotees of the TV series, "Friends", should look for David Schwimmer's cameo appearance in the film.

Jack Nicholson plays a middle aged, married, senior book editor for a publishing company. Driving home at night from a business trip in New England, he hits an animal on the road. When he gets out of his car to check on the condition of the animal, he discovers it to be a wolf. What happens next will change the course of his life forever.

When Jack gets back to his office, he is feeling the after effects of his interaction with the wolf. He is also concerned about his job, as his publishing house has been taken over by Christopher Plummer. Jack initially plays his character as a somewhat laid back, nice guy, a good man who doesn't see the knife being plunged into his back by his young, ambition driven underling, played with obsequious perfection by James Spader, until it is too late. Publishing is, indeed, a dog eat dog world.

Betrayed by his underling who has been given his job, Jack finds himself undergoing a subtle, physical metamorphosis. He no longer needs reading glasses, his hearing is extremely acute, and he has a keen, very keen, sense of smell. It is these enhanced senses that lead him to discover that his wife, well played by Kate Nelligan, has shockingly betrayed his love and devotion, causing him to leave her. It is a betrayal that is to have dire consequences for her.

Finding himself more robust and aggressive, literally a new man, Jack goes on the attack and, and with the aid of his loyal underling, played to perfection by David Hyde Pierce, gets his job back. He aggressively asserts himself with Spader and lets him know, in no uncertain terms, who is top dog. There is a memorable scene to this effect. In the process of regaining his life, Jack falls in love with the boss's beautiful daughter, played with gritty charm by Michelle Pfeiffer, and she with him.

Still, Jack finds himself battling his inner demons over his change. The transformation of Jack is subtle, and there is very lttle use of special effects to enhance his metamorphosis. Jack is often able to convey to the viewer what he is undergoing with a flick of the eyebrow, a twitch of the nose, a curl of the lips. It is a wonderful piece of acting and a tribute to the power of suggestion.

Certain events transpire that make Jack fear that his transformation will result in injury to Michelle. She eventually buys into his fear, misinterpreting certain events that take place. What he and she ultimately discover is that they both, in fact, have a great deal to fear, but that their initial fear was misplaced. Look to a great finale.

If you are the type of horror film fan who likes excessive gore, as well as many high tech, special effects, this is not the film for you, as there is very little of that in this film. This is a subtle, multi-layered, symbolic type of horror film that will leave the viewer analyzing what they just saw. It is simply a great werewolf film.


Wolf
Released in VHS Tape by Columbia/Tristar Studios (07 September, 1999)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Mike Nichols
Starring: Jack Nicholson and Michelle Pfeiffer
Sophisticated to a point, this well-executed wolf-man tale works due to its clever setting and enormous star power. We all know Jack Nicholson can go nuts, but the script makes his character aware of his changes, sometimes for the better, early on. The setting, a publishing house in the middle of a takeover, gives the characters dramatic life before the horror elements kicks in. A senior editor about to get the boot, Nicholson's character becomes a new man after being bitten by a wolf. He takes on challenges at work, lives a more robust life, and attracts a new love. But will his newfound energy consume him? Director Mike Nichols keeps the action alive in the first half, but the film peters out at the end with cheap theatrics and the overuse of slow motion. Michelle Pfeiffer has little to do as simply the love interest with a grittier than average personality. Better is James Spader as a smarmy colleague. Nicholson is in fine form, relying on his keen gift to spark interest (a twitch of the head, a look in the eyes), instead of heavy doses of movie makeup. Giuseppe Rotunno's sweeping camerawork sets the mood quite well. Easy to recommend, with the added feature it's hardly gratuitous. --Doug Thomas
Average review score:

A movie with a modest bite
Will Randall (Jack Nicholson) is the senior editor of a big book company and his life isn't as great as he would like it to be. However, things drastically change, and mostly improve, for Will after he is bitten by a mean looking wolf. Will soon finds out that he is changing more and more every day and that he is becoming like a wolf. Before long, he has better vision, hearing, and a spectacular sense of smell, but not everything has improved for Mr. Randall. Since he is now a lot more like a wolf, animals are now afraid of him and he becomes a murderer, just by following his wolf instincts. Will Mr. Randall find out what he's becoming, and is there a way to stop it?

"Wolf" is a pretty good movie. The makeup and the special effects in the movie aren't some of the best, but they get the job done. Jack Nicholson does a good job of acting and so does Michelle Pfeiffer as Will's new love interest. "Wolf" is a moderately exciting movie, it doesn't have as much blood and gore as you would expect it to have. It also doesn't have as much action as I would've liked to have seen, but it was still an entertaining movie and I recommend anybody who likes horror movies to at least watch "Wolf."

Intelligent horror film/character study
This is an interesting film, because it's partly a character study of a tired, middle aged publisher and partly a horror film about werewolves. Jack Nicholson plays a publisher about to lose his job to his friend and protege, who also happens to be sleeping with his wife. He seems too worn out to put up much of a fight, until he is bitten by a dying wolf, and begins to feel as if he has taken on its spirit. He also falls for the incredibly beautiful daughter of his boss (Michelle Pfeiffer). This movie has top notch acting, an intriuging story and a cool ending. I recommend it.

TOP DRAWER WEREWOLF MOVIE...
This is a thinking person's werewolf movie. Well directed by Mike Nichols, it features a stellar cast who give excellent performances. Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer, Christopher Plummer, James Spader, Kate Nelligan, and David Hyde Pierce all contribute to the successful execution of this sophisticated and subtle horror film. As an added bonus, those of you who are devotees of the TV series, "Friends", should look for David Schwimmer's cameo appearance in the film.

Jack Nicholson plays a middle aged, married, senior book editor for a publishing company. Driving home at night from a business trip in New England, he hits an animal on the road. When he gets out of his car to check on the condition of the animal, he discovers it to be a wolf. What happens next will change the course of his life forever.

When Jack gets back to his office, he is feeling the after effects of his interaction with the wolf. He is also concerned about his job, as his publishing house has been taken over by Christopher Plummer. Jack initially plays his character as a somewhat laid back, nice guy, a good man who doesn't see the knife being plunged into his back by his young, ambition driven underling, played with obsequious perfection by James Spader, until it is too late. Publishing is, indeed, a dog eat dog world.

Betrayed by his underling who has been given his job, Jack finds himself undergoing a subtle, physical metamorphosis. He no longer needs reading glasses, his hearing is extremely acute, and he has a keen, very keen, sense of smell. It is these enhanced senses that lead him to discover that his wife, well played by Kate Nelligan, has shockingly betrayed his love and devotion, causing him to leave her. It is a betrayal that is to have dire consequences for her.

Finding himself more robust and aggressive, literally a new man, Jack goes on the attack and, and with the aid of his loyal underling, played to perfection by David Hyde Pierce, gets his job back. He aggressively asserts himself with Spader and lets him know, in no uncertain terms, who is top dog. There is a memorable scene to this effect. In the process of regaining his life, Jack falls in love with the boss's beautiful daughter, played with gritty charm by Michelle Pfeiffer, and she with him.

Still, Jack finds himself battling his inner demons over his change. The transformation of Jack is subtle, and there is very lttle use of special effects to enhance his metamorphosis. Jack is often able to convey to the viewer what he is undergoing with a flick of the eyebrow, a twitch of the nose, a curl of the lips. It is a wonderful piece of acting and a tribute to the power of suggestion.

Certain events transpire that make Jack fear that his transformation will result in injury to Michelle. She eventually buys into his fear, misinterpreting certain events that take place. What he and she ultimately discover is that they both, in fact, have a great deal to fear, but that their initial fear was misplaced. Look to a great finale.

If you are the type of horror film fan who likes excessive gore, as well as many high tech, special effects, this is not the film for you, as there is very little of that in this film. This is a subtle, multi-layered, symbolic type of horror film that will leave the viewer analyzing what they just saw. It is simply a great werewolf film.


Wolf (Widescreen Edition)
Released in VHS Tape by Columbia/Tristar Studios (14 March, 2000)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Mike Nichols
Starring: Jack Nicholson and Michelle Pfeiffer
Sophisticated to a point, this well-executed wolf-man tale works due to its clever setting and enormous star power. We all know Jack Nicholson can go nuts, but the script makes his character aware of his changes, sometimes for the better, early on. The setting, a publishing house in the middle of a takeover, gives the characters dramatic life before the horror elements kicks in. A senior editor about to get the boot, Nicholson's character becomes a new man after being bitten by a wolf. He takes on challenges at work, lives a more robust life, and attracts a new love. But will his newfound energy consume him? Director Mike Nichols keeps the action alive in the first half, but the film peters out at the end with cheap theatrics and the overuse of slow motion. Michelle Pfeiffer has little to do as simply the love interest with a grittier than average personality. Better is James Spader as a smarmy colleague. Nicholson is in fine form, relying on his keen gift to spark interest (a twitch of the head, a look in the eyes), instead of heavy doses of movie makeup. Giuseppe Rotunno's sweeping camerawork sets the mood quite well. Easy to recommend, with the added feature it's hardly gratuitous. --Doug Thomas
Average review score:

A movie with a modest bite
Will Randall (Jack Nicholson) is the senior editor of a big book company and his life isn't as great as he would like it to be. However, things drastically change, and mostly improve, for Will after he is bitten by a mean looking wolf. Will soon finds out that he is changing more and more every day and that he is becoming like a wolf. Before long, he has better vision, hearing, and a spectacular sense of smell, but not everything has improved for Mr. Randall. Since he is now a lot more like a wolf, animals are now afraid of him and he becomes a murderer, just by following his wolf instincts. Will Mr. Randall find out what he's becoming, and is there a way to stop it?

"Wolf" is a pretty good movie. The makeup and the special effects in the movie aren't some of the best, but they get the job done. Jack Nicholson does a good job of acting and so does Michelle Pfeiffer as Will's new love interest. "Wolf" is a moderately exciting movie, it doesn't have as much blood and gore as you would expect it to have. It also doesn't have as much action as I would've liked to have seen, but it was still an entertaining movie and I recommend anybody who likes horror movies to at least watch "Wolf."

Intelligent horror film/character study
This is an interesting film, because it's partly a character study of a tired, middle aged publisher and partly a horror film about werewolves. Jack Nicholson plays a publisher about to lose his job to his friend and protege, who also happens to be sleeping with his wife. He seems too worn out to put up much of a fight, until he is bitten by a dying wolf, and begins to feel as if he has taken on its spirit. He also falls for the incredibly beautiful daughter of his boss (Michelle Pfeiffer). This movie has top notch acting, an intriuging story and a cool ending. I recommend it.

TOP DRAWER WEREWOLF MOVIE...
This is a thinking person's werewolf movie. Well directed by Mike Nichols, it features a stellar cast who give excellent performances. Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer, Christopher Plummer, James Spader, Kate Nelligan, and David Hyde Pierce all contribute to the successful execution of this sophisticated and subtle horror film. As an added bonus, those of you who are devotees of the TV series, "Friends", should look for David Schwimmer's cameo appearance in the film.

Jack Nicholson plays a middle aged, married, senior book editor for a publishing company. Driving home at night from a business trip in New England, he hits an animal on the road. When he gets out of his car to check on the condition of the animal, he discovers it to be a wolf. What happens next will change the course of his life forever.

When Jack gets back to his office, he is feeling the after effects of his interaction with the wolf. He is also concerned about his job, as his publishing house has been taken over by Christopher Plummer. Jack initially plays his character as a somewhat laid back, nice guy, a good man who doesn't see the knife being plunged into his back by his young, ambition driven underling, played with obsequious perfection by James Spader, until it is too late. Publishing is, indeed, a dog eat dog world.

Betrayed by his underling who has been given his job, Jack finds himself undergoing a subtle, physical metamorphosis. He no longer needs reading glasses, his hearing is extremely acute, and he has a keen, very keen, sense of smell. It is these enhanced senses that lead him to discover that his wife, well played by Kate Nelligan, has shockingly betrayed his love and devotion, causing him to leave her. It is a betrayal that is to have dire consequences for her.

Finding himself more robust and aggressive, literally a new man, Jack goes on the attack and, and with the aid of his loyal underling, played to perfection by David Hyde Pierce, gets his job back. He aggressively asserts himself with Spader and lets him know, in no uncertain terms, who is top dog. There is a memorable scene to this effect. In the process of regaining his life, Jack falls in love with the boss's beautiful daughter, played with gritty charm by Michelle Pfeiffer, and she with him.

Still, Jack finds himself battling his inner demons over his change. The transformation of Jack is subtle, and there is very lttle use of special effects to enhance his metamorphosis. Jack is often able to convey to the viewer what he is undergoing with a flick of the eyebrow, a twitch of the nose, a curl of the lips. It is a wonderful piece of acting and a tribute to the power of suggestion.

Certain events transpire that make Jack fear that his transformation will result in injury to Michelle. She eventually buys into his fear, misinterpreting certain events that take place. What he and she ultimately discover is that they both, in fact, have a great deal to fear, but that their initial fear was misplaced. Look to a great finale.

If you are the type of horror film fan who likes excessive gore, as well as many high tech, special effects, this is not the film for you, as there is very little of that in this film. This is a subtle, multi-layered, symbolic type of horror film that will leave the viewer analyzing what they just saw. It is simply a great werewolf film.


Related Subjects: Michael-J.-Fox
More Pages: Michelle-Pfeiffer Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10