Richard-Harris Movie Reviews


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VHS movie reviews for "Richard-Harris" sorted by average review score:

The Believers
Released in VHS Tape by Orion Home Video (06 October, 1998)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: John Schlesinger
Starring: Martin Sheen
John Schlesinger's The Believers, a kind of voodoo twist on Rosemary's Baby, is a horror movie where the echoes of otherworldly menace set the tone of terror, but the real evil comes from the hearts of humans. Recently widowed psychologist Martin Sheen moves to New York with his emotionally fragile son, and they become entwined in an underground cult that practices ritual sacrifice of children. Schlesinger is more interested in the human tale of loss and healing and the desperation of a grieving father fighting to protect his only child from a barbarous cabal. He favors mood and menace over spectacular splashes of horror, and even those moments of occult attack are directed with a sly sense of ambiguity. Though overlong and short on moments of genuine terror, this is a rare horror movie grounded in the palpable and powerful emotions of its characters. --Sean Axmaker
Average review score:

2.5, really...
Martin Sheen stars in this almost-scary voodoo flick. The pacing is just a little slow, and they take too long to s...h...o...w... y...o...u... e...v...e...r...y...t...h...i...n...g... in the santeria and brujeria rituals involved. Still, it's an okay horror flick. But to think: later he became President Bartlett!

Freaky and full of fear film!
This is a pretty scarey movie! The fact that it is a little old does not detract because this could happen anytime in any decade.

In a nutshell; A Father and his young son deal with shattering events in their lives and then are pulled into terrifying dangerous world of cults and ritualistic murder. Will they both come through all this alive?

More, if the above looks exciting:

The father is a police psychologist and there are some strange killings with horrible cult like killings. The father is deemed thru his job to frame a profile of this killer so that they can catch the killer.

As the movie moves forward, things begin to happen that keep you on the edge of your seat and delve you into the strange freakish world of cults and sacrificial killings. Soon this father and his son are pulled into the killer(s) world closer and closer and it will affect them both for the rest of their lives if they live through it!

Shocking surprise of an ending but I won't give any telling details of the movie away in case you want to see this and haven't yet seen the movie on cable or reg. tv. I would rent it before buying because it's a pretty disturbing movie but great if you like really freaky scarey movies.

If you liked Angel heart, you'll love this film. I liked it but it bothered me and I couldn't sleep well for several nights after seeing it the first time.

Good scares? You better believe it!
Of all the occult thillers that I have seen, this one is my most favorite. Not only does this intelligent horror film deliver the goods for nightmares, it carries a large cast of some very fine characters.Martin Sheen, Jimmy Smits, Robert Loggia and Helen Shaver are exceptonally good in their performances. However, the one that will stand out the most is the little known Malick Bowens. Bowens gives the film's villainous role such a demonic prescience, that it could perhaps scare Old Ned himself. This is a great film for those who do not spook easily and/or those with strong stomachs. However, it would be wise to forbid anyone under 15 to view this film because as I said before, it does not skimp on the details of ritualistic murders and supernatural occurences.


Murder She Said
Released in VHS Tape by Warner Home Video (24 April, 1991)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: George Pollock
Starring: Margaret Rutherford and Arthur Kennedy
Average review score:

The redoubtable Rutherford excels as Marple
She may not be what Agatha Christie envisioned as a sleuth, but, for my money, Margaret Rutherford does a splendid job. She went on to be featured in three more films, all featuring her skilled and captivating interpretation of Christie's elderly detective.

The film, though lightweight in suspense and complexity, is still entertaining enough to recommend. Composer Ron Goodwin makes intriguing and inspired use of what is obvious "The Marple Theme". It is interspersed throughout in various forms, adding to the enjoyment of the film.

Witty, silly good fun
Hilarious good fun with the grand Margaret Rutherford as Miss Marple posing as an ill tempered maid to get to the bottom of a murder she witnessed on a train. Full of wonderful English characters, improbable situations, and a real sense of the ridiculous. Good therapy for anxious times.

It's great!
When elderly spinster Jane Marple (played by Margaret Rutherford) witnesses a woman being stangled on a train, she demands quick action from the police. However, when they find nothing to substantiate her claim, she is dismissed, leaving her to find the murderer herself. Taking a job as a maid at Ackenthorpe Hall (the only place she can find where the body might have been hidden), she quickly finds the body, but finding the murderer, that will be much hard...and more dangerous. [Black and White, released in 1962, with a running time of 1 hour, 27 minutes.]

I must admit that my wife and I chanced across this Miss Marple movie after having become great fans of Joan Hickson's interpretation of the role, and were not too happy with it. Later, however, having accepted that this is not Joan Hickson's Miss Marple, but accepting it for its self, we came to love this movie. Margaret Rutherford brings a real presence to the role, adding a touch of humor, and making the story (based on Agatha Christie's "4:50 From Paddington") quite entertaining.

So, if you like a good mystery, or if you like old movies, then I highly recommend this movie to you. It's great!

(As an interesting aside, Agatha Christie liked Margaret Rutherford's interpretation of Miss Marple, and considered herself a fan. After watching this movie, though, she approached Joan Hickson (who played a minor role in this movie) and told her that someday she would play Miss Marple!)


The Underneath
Released in VHS Tape by Universal Studios (14 May, 1996)
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Director: Steven Soderbergh
Starring: Peter Gallagher and Elisabeth Shue
Whereas most movie remakes are straightforward updates of older (and usually better) movies, this 1994 crime drama tries to revitalize an old story with a few tricks of its own. Using the 1949 film noir thriller Criss Cross as his primary inspiration, director Steven Soderbergh takes a different, stylistically adventurous approach to the story of a habitual screwup (Peter Gallagher) who returns to Austin, Texas, for his mother's wedding and tries to pick up where he left off. He left a lot of people angry at him, including his abandoned wife (Alison Elliott) and some book-makers looking for payment on old debts. He concocts a robbery scheme after taking a job with an armored car company, and from that point forward Underneath lives up to its title, using multiple flashbacks to relay the story of a man who slips below the border of propriety and gets himself into all kinds of trouble. Although it's too low-key to generate consistent excitement, the movie draws you in with its intriguing plot and characters, and the flashback structure keeps you guessing about what will happen next. Not a great film by any means, but in hindsight it can be viewed as valuable preparation for Soderbergh's highly underrated 1998 thriller Out of Sight. --Jeff Shannon
Average review score:

A WOMAN'S REVENGE
Along with a few others, Steven SODERBERGH is one of the last authors-directors of the american cinema of today. He has the same problems than, before him, an Orson Welles or, closer from us, a John Sayles : how to present something personal and original and to make money and stay in the business ?

The structure of THE UNDERNEATH, a loose remake of Robert Siodmak's CRISS CROSS, is very interesting. Flashbacks and flashbacks in the flashbacks. It's not as literary as it seems and, at least, it keeps the audience awake without any need of explosions.

Soderbergh does an excellent work with his camera which, in its movements, often reflects the state of mind of the hero, Peter Gallagher. The scene in the hospital, in the last part of the movie, is, technically speaking, an achievement.

Bonus features are of above average-quality with an interesting comparison between the letter-box and the pan and scan version.

A should have a second chance DVD.

Great non-mainstream film
I usually don't watch suspense movies over and over again, but this one does.
The main character, played by Peter Gallagher, has serious integrity issues and a shady past, but you wouldn't know by his charm. He is a drifter running out of second chances, what will happen next? Will he give into temptation again? Has he finally met his match?
Watch and it a see

Underneath Much Under-rated
I have read the other reviews of this film and I am disappointed. Certainly, the film's narrative style contains jumps from one time period to the next. But that would only be interesting if the script and performances were interesting, too. And they are excellent. The film screwdly portrays the hero as a witty, angst-ridden nihilist surrounded by other nihilists (Tommy D and the hero's ex)who are one, and two, steps ahead of the hero, respectively (of course the Joe-Don Baker figure is three steps ahead). The unpretentious psychological depths of the film are one of its strongest features: Michael wears his Dad's suit to his mother's wedding, misuses the word "divorce" for marry" with respect to his mother. The homely, trite, but nevertheless tender relation between the mother and her new husband is a wonderful counterweight to Michael and Rachel's wicked (though much sexier) egotism. Settled age, age that has seen its limits, lived a lot, and wants the pleasures of company and routine are counterpoised to Rachel's cunning, calculating, perverse ambition. The brother figure - brilliantly acted - is an alternative to Michael - for he is dutiful to his mother and law-abiding. And yet, he also simmers with plots, and secretly envies his brother's bad-boy charm, good looks, and way with women. Michael tells his brother, in effect, that only the exhilirating, selfish highs make life worth living: winning a bet, seduction, etc. "There's what you want, and there's what's good for you. And they never meet." That's pretty good writing, and a good example of the diamond-hard-boiled phrasing that this excellent work is full of. I really detest pseudo-knowledgeable film reviews that tell you "the plot lags" or that there are "flashbacks-within-flashbacks." Who cares about special effects for their own sake? This is a movie that brilliantly weds selfishness with our common existential yearning for more and more possibility. It is a morality tale to the extent that it shows how destructive can be the pursuit of total ego-gratification, but it shows us this without also denying that Mom's tranquillity and comfort in old age consists in a vacant stare into the television, hoping to win the lottery. A watered down form of the same despair her son expresses through gambling, irony, and deceipt. A magnificent film.


Mack the Knife
Released in VHS Tape by Columbia/Tristar Studios (13 June, 2000)
MPAA Rating: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Director: Menahem Golan
Average review score:

enjoyable and fun
This movie is a fun, accessible version of the Threepenny Opera, a great introduction to Brecht's work with a well-cast ensemble. It makes a good double feature with The Beggars Opera starring none other than Roger Daltrey- nice to explore the 20th century alterations Brecht made in his adaptation of John Gay's original play. As far as the complaints about Mack the Knife being untrue to the "original" script- even during Brecht's time the play underwent constant revision (he found it acceptable to have his actors on stage reading the newly-altered script in their hands on opening night!) Both the Barbara Song and Pirate Jenny changed performers dependent on the strength of the actress playing the role. I have seen too many versions of this play to count and one of the things that is so delightful about Brecht's work is the multitudinous interpretations of his "intent" - when it comes to Brecht it's time to throw out the Canon and get the social message, tap your toes and enjoy. Strong singing performances and choreography, the acid bitterness of poverty, and exposed sexuality all make this movie a good one.

Very underrated version. First rate!
I'm a huge fan of Threepenny Opera, having seen my first performance as a teenager: the stupendous Off-Broadway revival with Lotte Lenya, Charlotte Rae & Beatrice Arthur. I went back to see it a year later with James Mitchell as Macheath & Ed Asner was Mr. Peachum.

I've seen every production I could since then. I've seen bald Mackeys & fat Mackeys & gay Mackeys. This is a highly versatile work. It has a brilliant score; in my opinion it's the greatest piece of musical theater of the 20th century.

I was surprised how captivating this film version is, especially considering that it has been virtually buried since its release. That's a real shame. The singing is magnificent & the dances were wonderful & fit perfectly with the theme of the piece. The costumes & sets are first-rate. Richard Harris gives the best performance I've seen him do on-screen (except for Wrestling Ernest Hemingway). Migenes as Jenny & Walters as Ms. Peachum are sensational. Raul Julia's terrific. Even the crowd scenes, which are so key to this piece, are surprisingly effective, with plenty of idiosyncratic faces & expressions in the roiling multitudes. Perhaps the key is that the production was filmed in Hungary.

I only have 2 quibbles: cut or transposed songs and the used of the "orthodox" translation (or a blend of Bltzstein & orthodox). It's been the vogue for years to put down Marc Blitzstein's libretto (which was the one used in the 1950's productions) as too "watered-down" in favor of the Eric Bentley-influenced more literal translations. This is unfortunate because the Blitzstein lyrics are idiomatic & immediate. They bring the characters that much more to life. The message of bitterness & anger doesn't go away just because the text isn't embedded with germanic sentence-structures (or a few 4-letter words).

Boy would I love to have a letterboxed DVD of this.

Dark fun
I also agree, Bobby Darrin has NOTHING to do with the original spirit of "ThreePenny Opera", no offense.

This show, if done as intended, will be fun and baudy, while at the same time, making the audience a little uncomfortable. That is the main essence of the piece, and I think this film captures it admirably. Sexy, rowdy, fun, and with an air of doom the entire time. I was a bit put off about them giving "Barbara Song" to Polly instead of Lucy, it changes the entire meaning of the song. Perhaps I'm just biased because I performed and loved that song. But none of the liberties taken with the material were unforgiveable in my opinion. The Tango number between Mack and Jenny is the best part, an edge-of-your-seat type sexiness and danger.

So don't let loyalty to the original format ruin your enjoyment of this film. Don't miss out!

Courtney Hebert Student at the American Musical and Dramatic Academy


Morning Glory
Released in VHS Tape by Turner Home Video (03 February, 1998)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Lowell Sherman
Starring: Katharine Hepburn and Douglas Fairbanks Jr.
Average review score:

VeRy GoOd
I thought it was good. Katherine Hepburn did a wonderful job in this movie & i enjoyed it alot.

Off to a Great Start!
Katherine Hepburn's first Oscar winning role is the perfect introduction to her personality and talent. An aristocratic, beautiful girl from New England takes the entertainment world by storm with her unique charm and iron resolve. Sound familiar? The "I don't wear cheap furs" scene had me choking with laughter, along with what I call the "drunken best of Shakespeare" scene where she launches into a chamgagne-fueled random explosion of highlights from "Romeo and Juliet" and "Hamlet" at a party for top theatre execs.

lovely, compelling drama
Katharine Hepburn netted her first Oscar for this, her masterful performance as a stagestruck young woman in MORNING GLORY.

Eva Lovelace (Katharine Hepburn) is a garrulous young girl from New England who comes to New York hoping for a big break on the stage. Walking into a producer's office one night, she attracts the attention of the producer (Adolphe Menjou) and the writer (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.) with her verve, nerve and zest. But they cannot see a future for her.

A few months later, she is an extra in Menjou's new play starring Rita Vernon (Mary Duncan). After Rita starts a fight minutes before the start of the play, she quits and leaves. Fairbanks Jr suggests Eva Lovelace, she goes on and becomes a huge star.

Based on the play by Zoe Akins, MORNING GLORY is a gentle drama filled with subtle performances. Standing out in the cast is Mary Duncan, who gives a delightful performance as the pushy Rita Vernon.

Highly recommended.


Silent Tongue
Released in VHS Tape by Lions Gate Home Ente (16 July, 2002)
MPAA Rating: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Director: Sam Shepard
Average review score:

If only...
As a true fan of River Phoenix I approach any film he's done with an incredibly open mind - maybe moreso than I should. Silent Tongue is a beautifully scripted and written Western revolving around a young man's loss of a loved one. Phoenix actually has only a dozen or so lines - with his silence though, he speaks volumes. His absorbtion of this character is flawless and eerily truthful. Richard Harris is wonderful here as in everything he does. His part is also not very wordy. In fact much of the film is wihtout dialogue. This creates a wonderful sense of the isolation of that era. It also allows the characters to be explored introspectively and with great depth. The true test of an actor is if he can embody the character with no lines; existing solely with his very being. Here River shows sheer perfection; conveying painfully his character's torment with only his body and his eyes!
However, this is where my praise for the film stops. Though it must have been an amazingly beautiful story to read, much was lost in translating it to film. Dermot Mulrooney has a large role. He botches it masterfully by grunting/shouting all his lines as though trying to reach predominately deaf people in the back row of a Theater he's not in. The effect is that none of what he says sounds honest, but more like a experimental, high school drama class failure. This is sad because in every other film I've seen him, he does a solid acting job worthy of much notice. There are also several scenes which are unnecessarily drawn out and campy. And as someone who loves the 1956 classic "Giant" which runs 3 1/2 hours, it takes a lot for me to call any scene in a Western drawn out.
Sam Shephard, Writer and Director of Silent Tongue, has produced dozens of brilliant plays etc. But to bring this story to life on film would have required much more attention to Cinematic effect than was given. Some things can captivate one reading a script, but simply don't hold up on the 'silver screen'. Even as an "artsy" film [A genre` which I LOVE], this doesn't quite achieve the goal. Nonetheless, one walks away from this film moved and touched - not only by River's brilliance, but also in realizing the magnitude of the story and message that must have inspired this film. And so even with its absurd moments and unfortunately wretched performance by Mulrooney, this is still a film I recommend for some. For Richard Harris and River Phoenix's performances more than make it worth a look.

Highly recommended
Resonant. This is what good film-making is all about.

Phenomenal ghost story. Very theatrical in tone.
Sam Shepard, the writer/director of "Silent Tongue," is one of the big names in contemporary American theatre. So it comes as no surprise that his two feature films--also, "Far North"--have a distinctly theatrical tone. General audiences may not have a taste for this, but Shepard's films do reward additional viewings, and both have grown on me in a big way.

"Silent Tongue" is a ghost story which uncovers a disturbing sickness at the heart of the Old West. River Phoenix becomes mentally unhinged when his Native American bride dies in childbirth. This sends his father, Richard Harris, on a journey to try and find another woman for his son. Exhibiting tragically limited imagination, the father returns to the traveling circus where he traded horses for the first woman, and he attempt a second bargain for the woman's sister. In the end, the sister must confront the dead woman's ghost, and we learn the dark secret of their past.

Phoenix is eerily convincing as the mad Talbot Roe, and Richard Harris is uncharacteristic low-key as the world-weary Prescott Roe. My only complaint is Dermot Mulroney who is miscast and unable to make his character's diction convincing.


Silent Tongue
Released in VHS Tape by Jef Films Int. (06 December, 1999)
MPAA Rating: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Director: Sam Shepard
Average review score:

If only...
As a true fan of River Phoenix I approach any film he's done with an incredibly open mind - maybe moreso than I should. Silent Tongue is a beautifully scripted and written Western revolving around a young man's loss of a loved one. Phoenix actually has only a dozen or so lines - with his silence though, he speaks volumes. His absorbtion of this character is flawless and eerily truthful. Richard Harris is wonderful here as in everything he does. His part is also not very wordy. In fact much of the film is wihtout dialogue. This creates a wonderful sense of the isolation of that era. It also allows the characters to be explored introspectively and with great depth. The true test of an actor is if he can embody the character with no lines; existing solely with his very being. Here River shows sheer perfection; conveying painfully his character's torment with only his body and his eyes!
However, this is where my praise for the film stops. Though it must have been an amazingly beautiful story to read, much was lost in translating it to film. Dermot Mulrooney has a large role. He botches it masterfully by grunting/shouting all his lines as though trying to reach predominately deaf people in the back row of a Theater he's not in. The effect is that none of what he says sounds honest, but more like a experimental, high school drama class failure. This is sad because in every other film I've seen him, he does a solid acting job worthy of much notice. There are also several scenes which are unnecessarily drawn out and campy. And as someone who loves the 1956 classic "Giant" which runs 3 1/2 hours, it takes a lot for me to call any scene in a Western drawn out.
Sam Shephard, Writer and Director of Silent Tongue, has produced dozens of brilliant plays etc. But to bring this story to life on film would have required much more attention to Cinematic effect than was given. Some things can captivate one reading a script, but simply don't hold up on the 'silver screen'. Even as an "artsy" film [A genre` which I LOVE], this doesn't quite achieve the goal. Nonetheless, one walks away from this film moved and touched - not only by River's brilliance, but also in realizing the magnitude of the story and message that must have inspired this film. And so even with its absurd moments and unfortunately wretched performance by Mulrooney, this is still a film I recommend for some. For Richard Harris and River Phoenix's performances more than make it worth a look.

Highly recommended
Resonant. This is what good film-making is all about.

Phenomenal ghost story. Very theatrical in tone.
Sam Shepard, the writer/director of "Silent Tongue," is one of the big names in contemporary American theatre. So it comes as no surprise that his two feature films--also, "Far North"--have a distinctly theatrical tone. General audiences may not have a taste for this, but Shepard's films do reward additional viewings, and both have grown on me in a big way.

"Silent Tongue" is a ghost story which uncovers a disturbing sickness at the heart of the Old West. River Phoenix becomes mentally unhinged when his Native American bride dies in childbirth. This sends his father, Richard Harris, on a journey to try and find another woman for his son. Exhibiting tragically limited imagination, the father returns to the traveling circus where he traded horses for the first woman, and he attempt a second bargain for the woman's sister. In the end, the sister must confront the dead woman's ghost, and we learn the dark secret of their past.

Phoenix is eerily convincing as the mad Talbot Roe, and Richard Harris is uncharacteristic low-key as the world-weary Prescott Roe. My only complaint is Dermot Mulroney who is miscast and unable to make his character's diction convincing.


Best of the Muppet Show - Elton John / Julie Andrews / Gene Kelly
Released in VHS Tape by Columbia Tristar Hom (25 March, 2003)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Directors: Philip Casson and Peter Harris
Average review score:

Good content, but disappointing
This DVD includes 3 episodes of "The Muppet Show." I have always loved the Muppets, and it is good to see this great show get DVD treatment. While the content is fun and entertaining, it is minimal. There are very little special features. While the features provide a few small laughs, they don't really have much to do with the episodes themselves. And there are only three episodes. I call that [very costly]. I don't care for "Best of" sets in the first place (I prefer Season Sets), but they could at least included more material. They could easily fit 5 to 6 episodes on one disc, especially considering the absense of a lot of bonus features.

Overall, it's an enjoyable disc but it doesn't quite satisfy me. Buy it only if you can get it for a bargain price.

Where Elton John?
How fabulous is this collection? When I brought "The Muppet Movie" DVD to home to my 2-year-old, who watches this disc religiously, her question upon inspecting the cover was, "Where Elton John?" Judging from the hippy-dippy look in Elton's eyes, he's somewhere between Saturn and Jupiter during most of this taping, but who cares? This DVD is worth it for the Elton episode alone (how many other half-hour shows have you seen him on where he actually sings?). The Gene Kelly show is sweet, too. Buy it for you, say it's for your kid, and turn "Crocodile Rock" up REAL loud. La, la, la, la, laaaaaa...

This one was really good
As a true fan of the Muppets I was thrilled to get this tape! Every guest was great, and Julie Andrews still rules! The best episode out on tape the only thing I didn't care for was the last number, a little cheesy, but other than that wonderful! I also found I truly loved Elton John's music from this. This is one I plan to watch over again.


Danielle Steel's Message From Nam
Released in VHS Tape by Anchor Bay Entertainment (18 November, 1997)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Paul Wendkos
Average review score:

To sad for my taste.
I didn't see quite the whole movie but what I did see was really sad. I didn't cry though. I would have given it 1 star but part of it was pretty exciting or interesting.

Message from Nam Danielle Steel
i thought this movie was great! it was the first time i had seen it and i had never read the book before so i thought it did a good job portraing all the characters. they did a wonderful job with paxton andrews part. i think many people who read danielle steel will enjoy this movie and book.

Message from Nam
This movie is my favorite movie of all time. I read the Danielle Steele's book, as always (she's my favorite), but the movie is something I think I could watch every day. I love it. Even though I was only about 8 or 10 when my brother was in Nam for 2 terms, I always respected him. He enlisted, not drafted. I can honestly say that I even respect him more after watching this movie, and its not even based on a true story. I have to buy this video!!


The Heroes of Telemark
Released in VHS Tape by Columbia/Tristar Studios (11 February, 1997)
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Director: Anthony Mann
Starring: Kirk Douglas and Richard Harris
Average review score:

Enjoyable, but hardly historically correct
"Heroes of Telemark" is an enjoyable sixties Hollywood war movie. But view it for entertainment (and Kirk Douglas), not as a history lesson. For that - and indeed for a filmatically better movie! - try instead "La bataille de l'eau lourde" (Jean Dreville / Titus Vibe-Müller, 1947). It's more accurate, more dramatic, has better photography - and even have some of the original saboteurs playing themselves.

Spartacus takes on the Nazis in Norway
Based on a true story. Norwegian resistance fighters sabotage the Nazi German effort to produce heavy water for German atomic research during World War Two. Breathtaking snowy Norwegian locations serve as a beautiful backdrop for the plot. Kirk Douglas superbly plays the role of a Norwegian physics professor who, though originally content to wait out the war, is soon pulled heart and soul into the struggle. Though somewhat toned down from the book of the same name (The Germans were much nastier in the printed version), the spirit of the conflict is accurately portrayed without the superhuman fiction that is found in other war movies of the 1960's. As a bit of trivia, Kirk Douglas accepted a starring role in this movie as a favor to Director Anthony Mann. Anthony Mann was the original director for SPARTACUS before he was replaced by Stanley Kubrick.

Awsome
This is a really good movie. Kirk palys the role as a NOrwegian really well.

I liked it.


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